ANNOUNCEMENT: Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Projects

Deakin University’s CIE staff members have also been included on successful Linkage projects led by other institutions:

Graeme H.
Graeme H.

Professor Graeme Hays – Faculty of Science, Engineering & Built Environment. Project led by University of Queensland.

Professor Graeme Hays, from the CIE, will work on an ARC-funded project led by the University of Queensland. The project aims to answer key questions about the biology, ecology and sustainability of the world’s manta ray species to provide the information and tools for management and conservation of these charismatic and valuable species. In particular, the project aims to determine the likely impact of climate variability and fisheries that operate to Australia’s north on manta-based ecotourism in the Indo-Pacific region, as climate change and active low-value fisheries may both jeopardise a high-value ecotourism industry. The project seeks to explore geographic distributions, local and large-scale movements, population sizes, structure, and inter-connectivity in the region to assess the effect of climate and fisheries on manta ray populations.

Euan R.
Euan R.

Dr Euan Richie – Faculty of Science, Engineering & Built Environment. Project led by University of Tasmania.

Dr Euan Ritchie, from the CIE, is a chief investigator working on an ARC-funded project led by the University of Tasmania. The project aims to examine the effects of traditional Aboriginal and contemporary fire management on kangaroo abundance. There is concern that the cessation of Aboriginal patch burning is causing savanna kangaroo populations to decline across northern Australia. In this project, surveys will be planned to determine whether fire regime (frequency, extent, season) affects kangaroo distribution and abundance and the degree to which non-native large herbivores compete with kangaroos for forage. Experiments will also be planned to discover how the season of burning influences forage quality and quantity. This project is designed to determine if patch burning can be used for ecological restoration in areas where this type of fire management has ceased and for improvement of tropical savanna fire management.

Please join us in congratulating our colleagues!