CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Climate adaptation for Australia’s threatened species

SPEAKER: Dr Kita Ashman, Threatened Species and Climate Adaptation Ecologist, WWF Australia

DATE & TIME: Thursday, 16th September 2021 @ 4:00PM.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 408 120 6183, Password: 06048505).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

The past three scorching Australian summers, setting new national temperature and bushfire records, have made the threat of climate change on Australia’s wildlife demonstrable. Consequently, climate change – or more specifically, the need to better understand how to help species adapt and become more resilient to a warming climate needs to be factored into all on-going conservation efforts.

WWF Australia is currently investing over $1M to test approaches to reduce the vulnerability of wildlife to changes in the climate through on-the-ground projects. These projects work across a variety of species and landscapes, and are in collaboration with leading researchers, environmental organisations, and Traditional Owner groups.

This presentation will highlight some of the projects that are being implemented under WWF’s Threatened Species & Climate Adaptation Strategy.


BIO.

Kita Ashman studied Wildlife & Conservation Biology as an undergrad at Deakin, then went on to do an honours project on the evolution of moth signalling structures, with Matt Symodns – also at Deakin. After honours, she completed a PhD in Wildlife Ecology (as you guess it – Deakin), focussing on koala distribution, abundance and spatial dynamics in plantation landscapes, under Desley Whisson’s supervision.

Kita has worked on koala management programs with state governments in VIC and SA, and has worked on the Glossy Black Cockatoo recovery program and on Zoo’s Vic Leadbeater’s possum recovery program.

After completing her PhD, she did a short stint in David Lindenmayer’s lab at ANU, monitoring biodiversity throughout the Central Highlands, then jumped ship when she was offered her current role as Threatened Species & Climate Adaptation Ecologist at WWF Australia.

For more information on Kita’s work watch this video or read more on the WWF-Australia website. You can also follow Kita on Twitter (click HERE).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

One tap mobile
+61731853730,,4081206183# Australia
+61861193900,,4081206183# Australia

Dial by your location
        +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
        +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
        +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
        +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
        +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
Meeting ID: 408 120 6183
Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kbmpLHKjBY

Join by SIP
4081206183@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

Join by Skype for Business
https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/4081206183

CIE 2021 Annual Conference (Virtual): Can technological Ecosystem Maintenance and Monitoring Units (EMUs) be justified?

PLENARY SPEAKER: Associate Professor Alan Dorin, Monash University.

We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the 2021 CIE Annual Conference (Virtual) to be held on Thursday, 14th and Friday, 15th October 2021.


ABSTRACT.

The use of technology to monitor and manage natural and agricultural ecosystems is increasing at a rapid rate. Electronics may improve our understanding of biodiversity and provide socio-economic benefits, but this same technology can also undermine conservation efforts, damage habitat and drive people into poverty.

How can we help to ensure EMUs embedded within ecosystems generate more global benefit than harm? How can we ensure they preserve the aesthetic and cultural value of their environment? Does it matter if technology is used to kill or harm organisms? Which organisms should we destroy? And which should we save? Why? How do we make such decisions?

Even in cases where technology is apparently being used to passively monitor animal behaviour to improve our understanding, and potentially offer solutions to conservation problems, is it ethical to operate a computationally expensive deep-learning algorithm on a super-computer in the USA, in order to track the movement of a single insect on a flower in Australia?

How do we justify the consumption of energy this entails? How do we weigh up the costs of the machine’s manufacture and disposal against the gains it potentially offers us for improved pollination and biodiversity?

In this talk I will explore examples that expose the complex relationships between the world’s living systems and our use of technology in ecology.


BIO.

Alan Dorin is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University where he leads the Computational and Collective Intelligence group. He researches the ways in which technology assists discovery in the ecological sciences and in human creativity.

Through his work in Artificial Life and ecological simulation, Alan explores the key attributes of organisms that enable them to live in complex environments. This knowledge is used to improve horticulture, and to assist us in understanding and maintaining natural ecosystems.

Alan promotes exploration of the relationships between technology and human endeavour by nurturing curiosity and encouraging students to form their own bridges between disciplines. He is co-editor in chief of the Artificial Life journal.

For more information click HERE.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar/talk that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Study on the potential conservation sites for three species of Asian horseshoe crabs in Indonesia

SPEAKER: Dr Lusita Meilana, Ecology, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, China.

DATE & TIME: Friday, 10th September 2021 @ 12:00noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 408 120 6183, Password: 06048505).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

The horseshoe crab has been reported as a significant player in supporting pharmaceutical industries. To this end, conservation scientists have been striving to protect the species from dwindling in population for the sustainable global utilization of horseshoe crab blood.

Although several countries have made progress in conserving the spawning and nursery grounds, Indonesia faces several challenges in setting up the conservation sites.

These main challenges include: (1) a dearth of knowledge of ecology and population status of horseshoe crabs in Indonesia, and (2) none of the previous studies have reported spawning/nursery grounds of horseshoe crabs nor have documented horseshoe crab larvae and juveniles in Indonesia.

In this talk, I will explore (1) the population status, potential distribution, and associated threats of Indonesian horseshoe crabs, (2) the characteristic of the nursery habitat of juvenile Asian horseshoe crabs and their correlation with population density, and (3) the priority area for conservation with a new approach.


BIO.

I am a postdoctoral researcher of the Ecology at Xiamen University and a member of the Asian Horseshoe crabs Working Group (WG) of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Horseshoe Crab Species Specialist Group (SSG).

My Ph.D. thesis project was focused on the spatial identification of marine protected areas (MPAs), constructs a method for identifying potential marine protected areas based on cumulative risk assessment, and carries out practical applications. The horseshoe crab is one of the case study species.

For more information click HERE.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

One tap mobile
+61731853730,,4081206183# Australia
+61861193900,,4081206183# Australia

Dial by your location
        +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
        +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
        +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
        +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
        +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
Meeting ID: 408 120 6183
Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kbmpLHKjBY

Join by SIP
4081206183@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

Join by Skype for Business
https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/4081206183

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Understanding migration timing of populations and individuals – insights from Bar-tailed Godwits in New Zealand

SPEAKER: Dr Phil Battley, Associate Professor in Zoology, Wildlife and Ecology Group, Massey University, New Zealand.

DATE & TIME: Friday, 3rd September 2021 @ 12:00noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 408 120 6183, Password: 06048505).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Why do individual birds migrate when they do? Why does a bird show zero interest in migrating one day yet rally a departing flock the next?

Simple observations in the field can lead to rich research endeavours, and we have spent the past 15 years intermittently filling in our understanding of individual variation timing of Bar-tailed Godwits, one of the world’s most extreme avian migrants.

In this talk I will explore why birds migrate at consistently different times, and outline how a paragon of consistency can turn out to be an exemplar of flexibility in migration timing.


BIO.

I’m a New Zealand ornithologist who works mainly on the ecology and behaviour of migratory shorebirds, especially the Bar-tailed Godwits that breed in Alaska and spend the nonbreeding season in New Zealand (and Australia).

For more information click HERE.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

One tap mobile
+61731853730,,4081206183# Australia
+61861193900,,4081206183# Australia

Dial by your location
        +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
        +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
        +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
        +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
        +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
Meeting ID: 408 120 6183
Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kbmpLHKjBY

Join by SIP
4081206183@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

Join by Skype for Business
https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/4081206183

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Parrots, pathogens and conservation

SPEAKER: Dr Johanne Marie Martens, BirdLife Australia.

DATE & TIME: Friday, 27th August 2021 @ 12:00noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 408 120 6183, Password: 06048505).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

I will give an overview over my PhD research on Beak and Feather Disease Virus (BFDV), followed by insights into my current role at BirdLife Australia, the nation’s largest bird conservation organisation.

For my PhD, I studied BFDV prevalence and load in a range of locally abundant wild psittacines, with a focus on the Crimson Rosella, in which I investigated seasonal variation of BFDV prevalence and load, indirect transmission via nesting material, and persistence of infection over time.

In my current role at BirdLife Australia, I focus on a different threat to parrots and other birds: Fire. The 2019/20 ‘Black Summer’ bushfires have had a significant impact on many taxa. The objective of the project I work under is to provide a comprehensive, national post-fire assessment of Mainland Ground Parrot and Eastern Bristlebird across their known ranges.


BIO.

Johanne completed her PhD at Deakin University’s Centre for Integrative Ecology in 2020 and now holds a role as Post-fire Assessment Coordinator at BirdLife Australia, while also being involved in the Orange-bellied Parrot mainland release program with Zoos Victoria.

For her PhD in Prof Andy TD Bennett’s group, she investigated Beak and Feather Disease Virus in wild Australian parrots and cockatoos.

Before moving to Australia in 2016, she worked at the ornithology department of the Stuttgart State Natural History Museum in Germany, studying wild urban parrots, a project she had started in 2011 for her BSc. She wrote her MSc thesis about implanted heart rate/body temperature loggers in ducks at the Max Planck- Institute for Ornithology.

For more information click HERE (Twitter).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

One tap mobile
+61731853730,,4081206183# Australia
+61861193900,,4081206183# Australia

Dial by your location
        +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
        +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
        +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
        +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
        +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
Meeting ID: 408 120 6183
Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kbmpLHKjBY

Join by SIP
4081206183@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

Join by Skype for Business
https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/4081206183

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Animal colour vision, understanding perception and uncertainty to improve colour modelling

SPEAKER: Dr Jair Garcia Mendoza, Bio-Inspired Digital Sensing Lab (BIDS), School of Media and Communications, RMIT University.

DATE & TIME: Friday, 20th August 2021 @ 12:00noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 408 120 6183, Password: 06048505).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Colour discrimination, the ability to discern one hue from another given a particular context, is fundamental for animals allowing them to detect food, hide from predators or identifying potential mates. Whilst our understanding of the physical phenomena driving signal production and reception by the visual system of different animals has significantly expanded in the past few decades, development of tools to model the perceptual nature of colour vision progresses at a slower pace in spite of significant advances in colour vision theory.

A reason for this is the difficulty of including the probabilistic nature of perception into current models for animal colour vision. In this session we will explore the perceptual nature of colour vision using evidence from vertebrate and insect models to understand why frequently used colour models are limited to properly model colour perception in animals.

Then, we will explore a new generation of models for colour vision in key animal species which incorporate the probabilistic nature of colour perception.


BIO.

Jair Garcia was born in Colombia (South America) where he completed his undergraduate studies in Biology. After working both as an educator and fine art photographer, he cursed his post-graduate studies at RMIT University (Melbourne, Australia) where he explored the use of digital technologies as a proxy for animal vision to understand camouflage strategies in desert lizards.

After completing his PhD, Jair has continuing working on animal colour vision using as a model the honeybee, and exploring the role of attention and cognition in visual perception using eye-tracking technology.

For more information click HERE (Twitter).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

One tap mobile
+61731853730,,4081206183# Australia
+61861193900,,4081206183# Australia

Dial by your location
        +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
        +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
        +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
        +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
        +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
Meeting ID: 408 120 6183
Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kbmpLHKjBY

Join by SIP
4081206183@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

Join by Skype for Business
https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/4081206183

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Neuropeptide sNPF modulates appetitive behaviour of honey bees

SPEAKER: Louise Bestea, Research Center of Animal Cognition, Center for Integrative Biology, University Paul Sabatier, France.

.

DATE & TIME: Thursday, 12th August 2021 @ 4:00PM.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 896 4639 8370, Password: 17316097).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

In mammals, feeding behaviour is modulated by several neuropeptides such as the neuropeptide Y (NPY), which in higher concentrations enhances food intake. In the honey bee (Apis mellifera), two independent homologs of NPY, the neuropeptide F (NPF) and the short neuropeptide F (sNPF), have been identified but only the latter has a coupled receptor (sNPFR).

A functional link exists between sNPF signaling and feeding behavior under conditions of starvation in isolated foragers: a reduction of the transcript levels of sNPFR by RNAi alters the perception of the satiation state in starved bees, which then behave like their fed counterparts. Conversely, sNPF topical application triggers food intake in fed bees. Besides, sNPF also modulates sensory perception prior to ingestion.

Topical application of sNPF increases, therefore, sucrose responsiveness and spontaneous responses to appetitive odors at the individual level. Multiphoton recordings of neural activity in the antennal lobe, the primary olfactory center of the bee brain, revealed that fed animals exhibit a decreased responsiveness to appetitive odors that is rescued by treatment with sNPF to the level exhibited by starved bees.

Given the enhancing effect of sNPF on sucrose responsiveness, we then studied if this effect translates to appetitive learning and memory. Starved bees performed better than fed untreated bees.

Treating fed bees with sNPF improved their memory retention to the level of starved bees. Therefore, sNPF acts as a modulator of sensory perception which in turn influences cognitive abilities of bees.


BIO.

During the 2nd year of my Masters I studied pollinator effectiveness in South Africa and took part in various conservation work with the NGO Nature’s Valley Trust.

I am now a 3rd year PhD student at the Research Centre of Animal Cognition (Toulouse, France) working on honey bees’ behaviour (and about to hand in my thesis manuscript).

My PhD work focuses on the effect of the short neuropeptide sNPF to understand how it modulates hunger state of forager bees, thus food-related behaviours. We used different approaches such as pharmacology, behavioural experiments, electrophysiology and multiphoton imaging to unravel the influence of sNPF on food-decision making.

For more information click HERE (Twitter).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

One tap mobile
+61280156011,,89646398370# Australia
+61370182005,,89646398370# Australia

Dial by your location
        +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
        +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
        +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
        +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
        +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
Meeting ID: 896 4639 8370
Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kddtp5Bkr0

Join by SIP
89646398370@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

Join by Skype for Business
https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/89646398370

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Post PhD life at CSIRO

SPEAKER: Jessica Hodgson, Research Technician, Adaptive Ecosystem Management Team, Land & Water, CSIRO.

DATE & TIME: Friday, 6th August 2021 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 408 120 6183, Password: 06048505).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Since leaving Deakin behind, Jess moved to Canberra and is now a part of the Adaptive Ecosystems Management Team of CSIRO.

In this seminar she will introduce the varied nature of her work in ecology as a Research Technician. For much of the year her role sends her around the country to conduct flora surveys in threatened ecological communities, catching large waterbirds to satellite track their movements or climbing 70m tall research towers.

She has acquired numerous new skills since joining including app development, a UAV Pilot licence, spatial analysis, vertical tower rescue and building databases – all of which she never expected when she finished her PhD.


BIO.

Jess finished her PhD at Deakin in 2019. She studied Great Bowerbirds and their role as ecosystem engineers with Prof John Endler.

Afterwards she moved to the Adaptive Ecosystem Management Team at CSIRO in Canberra where she now leads fieldwork and co-leads research on waterbirds, biodiversity monitoring and bushfire recovery.

For more information click HERE (Twitter).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

  • One tap mobile

+61731853730,,4081206183# Australia
+61861193900,,4081206183# Australia

  • Dial by your location

+61 7 3185 3730 Australia
+61 8 6119 3900 Australia
+61 8 7150 1149 Australia
+61 2 8015 6011 Australia
+61 3 7018 2005 Australia

Meeting ID: 408 120 6183

Find your local number: https://deakin.zoom.us/u/kbmpLHKjBY

  • Join by SIP

4081206183@zoom.aarnet.edu.au

  • Join by Skype for Business

https://deakin.zoom.us/skype/4081206183

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: An ecological perspective on timing in tiny brains

SPEAKER: Leslie Ng, Stuart-Fox Lab, School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne.

DATE & TIME: Friday, 30th July 2021 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 873 3601 0495, Password: 90323570).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Time is a fundamental dimension of all biological processes, but how relevant is time sense to non-human animals, especially those with miniature insect brains? In my PHD I explore the time sense of the European honey bee, one of the few insect species that has been discussed in this context.

Bees are known to have circadian timing abilities and can use time-related memories to efficiently forage from food sources that operate on circadian or temporal rhythms. However, their capacity to process time intervals of short durations remains unclear. Mixed results in the bee literature suggest that the timing of intervals is highly complex and may potentially be context dependent.

To further understand the complexities of interval timing, I investigated the ecological significance of time sense and found that an ecological perspective provided a nuanced understanding of previous findings and revealed important knowledge gaps.

In this talk I will discuss the interesting world of honey bee time sense, as well as share some new perspectives of interval timing, and how temporal information may or may not be relevant to animals in natural conditions.


BIO.

Leslie Ng is currently a third year PHD candidate at the School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne. His interests include insect colour vision, bee psychophysics, and conceptual learning.

He is now primarily investigating honey bee cognition in his PHD, with a specific focus on the interval timing abilities of insect brains, and the ecological relevance of time sense.

For more information click HERE (Twitter).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

  • One tap mobile
    • +61280156011,,87336010495# Australia
    • +61370182005,,87336010495# Australia
  • Dial by your location
    • +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
    • +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
    • +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
    • +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
    • +61 8 7150 1149 Australia

CIE Seminar Series – 2021: Resilience and adaptation in smallholder agriculture to climate change

SPEAKER: Prahlad Lamichhane, PhD Candidate (Planet A Sustainability Science), Deakin University (Burwood Campus).

DATE & TIME: Friday, 23rd July 2021 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 834 8884 1086, Password: 53122403).

Scroll down for more options on how to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Smallholder agriculture generates almost two-thirds of the food need in developing countries but has been heavily exposed to climatic variabilities. Safeguarding smallholder agriculture from climate change would contribute to enhanced food security in the region.

With the case study of western Nepal, the PhD project studied resilience and adaptation in smallholder agriculture to underpin adaptation strategies.

This talk will present how we empirically quantified the smallholder resilience, variabilities in resilience across heterogeneities, and capital variable’s capacity to explain resilience.

I will then briefly present farmer’s adaptation motivation using Protection Motivation Model for the study area to describe the determinants of the adaptation.

Finally, I present the barriers to adaptation in smallholder agriculture before presenting how the research informs adaptation strategies.


BIO.

I am a PhD Candidate at Deakin University. I recently submitted my PhD for examination. Before my PhD, I spent almost a decade on risk and vulnerabilities reduction, building resilience, and policy dialogue in Nepal and South Asia.

I am academically trained in Resources Engineering and Environmental Management, with a broad interest in socio-ecological resilience, agricultural development, and sustainable development.

For more information click HERE (Twitter) or HERE (Planet-A website).


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!


More options on how to connect:

  • One tap mobile
    • +61871501149,,83488841086# Australia
    • +61280156011,,83488841086# Australia
  • Dial by your location
    • +61 8 7150 1149 Australia
    • +61 2 8015 6011 Australia
    • +61 3 7018 2005 Australia
    • +61 7 3185 3730 Australia
    • +61 8 6119 3900 Australia
    • Meeting ID: 834 8884 1086