CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Buruli ulcer: an Australian zoonosis?

DATE & TIME: Friday 24th June 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 813 0275 8867, Password: 01175415).

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ABSTRACT.

In recent years reported cases of Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), have increased substantially in Victoria, Australia, with the epidemic also expanding geographically. Previous studies suggest that BU may be a zoonotic disease in Australia, but how this pathogen circulates in the environment and transmits to humans is still poorly understood.

Here I will discuss the role animals and vectors may play in the environmental circulation of MU and will present findings from a recent case-control study. Using questionnaires and environmental sampling, this study aimed to identify behavioural and environmental risk factors by analysing data collected from recent BU cases and postcode-matched controls and their respective residential properties. The findings from this study provide further support for the hypothesis that MU is zoonotic in Victoria, with ringtail possums the strongest reservoir host candidate.


BIO.

Kim Blasdell is an infectious disease scientist with a focus on zoonotic viruses. Her initial studies were in Zoology at the university of Liverpool, where she conducted an honours project on the shedding behaviour of snakes. After graduation she undertook a PhD at the same institution, studying the rodent-borne viruses, LCMV and cowpox virus, in their natural hosts.

Her first position after this was as the research coordinator for Frontier’s Cambodian project, which saw her living in the jungle for a year supervising volunteers and conducting biodiversity assessments. After some time spent travelling she returned to Cambodia as a postdoc at the Institut Pasteur du Cambodge. Her focus this time was on rodent-borne pathogens in rapidly changing environments. As part of this project she identified two novel arenaviruses, one of which was tentatively associated with disease in humans.

Kim moved to CSIRO to start her second postdoc in 2010, changing her research focus to arboviruses, particularly those affecting cattle. During this time she developed her skills in NGS and characterised several little known arboviruses. On completion of this project she continued at CSIRO as a research scientist, continuing to study livestock-associated arboviruses, but also returning to rodent-borne viruses.In conjunction with Dr Cadhla Firth (now at EcoHealth), she recently conducted a project looking at the impact of urbanisation on rodent-borne pathogens.

Her current research focus is on understanding the ecology and potential transmission routes of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the agent of Buruli ulcer, and on the ecology of several vector-borne diseases.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: ACDP Avian Virology lab – what we do and High Path Avian Flu in Australia & The pathogenesis of HPAIV in surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)

DATE & TIME: Friday 27th May 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 857 4842 0333, Password: 80150153).

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ABSTRACT.

Dr. Jeff Butler will present his talk on “ACDP Avian Virology lab – what we do and High Path Avian Flu in Australia”. From Jeff: “In this talk I will provide a short overview of the work we do in the Avian Virology Diagnostic lab at ACDP followed by an overview of the threat posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) to the Australian poultry industry and some of the work we do on HPAI in our laboratory.”

Dr. Jasmina Luczo will present her talk on “The pathogenesis of HPAIV in surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)”. From Jasmina: “Surf scoters are large diving sea ducks native to North America, with breeding grounds situated in the boreal tundra transitional zone across northern Canada and Alaska, and wintering areas located on both the east and west coasts of continental USA. The geographical distribution of surf scoters overlaps that of migratory birds known to transmit HPAIVs. Consequently, it is important to understand the potential role of surf scoters in HPAIV spread and evolution.”


BIO.

Jeff Butler is the Team Leader of the Diagnostic Virology Group at the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness in Geelong. His role is to coordinate the work of his team members in the Avian and Mammalian Virology Laboratories which primarily includes routine diagnostic testing of exotic avian and mammalian viral diseases (e.g. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, Newcastle Disease, Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Hendra/Nipah Virus, Foot and Mouth Disease Virus, Bluetongue Virus, Australian Bat Lyssavirus, African Swine Fever, Classical Swine Fever and many other viruses). Jeff maintains a current research interest in the characterization of emerging Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza viruses. He also has particular interests in Australian Avian Influenza viruses and, investigating the adaptation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza viruses to mammals, which was the focus of his PhD.

From Jasmina: I am a virologist at the Australian Centre of Disease Preparedness. My research interests include the pathogenesis of HPAIV in avian species, virulence determinants of HPAIV, and the functional evolution of avian influenza viruses.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Biodiversity Indicators (PhD Seminar)

DATE & TIME: Friday 13th May 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom and in-person at Room T3.22, Burwood campus. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 869 7351 6052, Password: 91401926).

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ABSTRACT.

The reality of global biodiversity loss is vast, highly complex, and difficult to comprehend. Biodiversity indicators are policy tools designed to distill this complexity into digestible forms useful for decision making.

The development of terrestrial indicators is still in its infancy however, and many indicators, such as the Red List Index, are deployed with little knowledge about whether they are fit for intended purpose. In fisheries science and economics, indicators are often subjected to more rigorous performance testing to establish their strengths and limitations in different contexts.

My PhD research aimed to translate some of these concepts and methods to the world of terrestrial biodiversity indicators.

This seminar will highlight some key results that can inform the effective use of terrestrial indicators, which are particularly relevant to upcoming negotiations on the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework under the Convention on Biological Diversity.


BIO.

Simone completed her PhD research on biodiversity indicators in the Deakin Conservation Science Lab, led by Prof Emily Nicholson, submitting her thesis in late 2021. Prior to her PhD she worked on international marine policy for the Pacific Islands Forum.

Simone is now working as a postdoc for the Deakin Marine Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab led by Dr. Eric Treml, where she is working on developing quantitative tools for managing marine biosecurity risk in New Zealand.

Follow Simone on Twitter for more information.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Vector-borne diseases: an integrated approach

SPEAKER: Dr. Prasad Paradkar (CSIRO)

DATE & TIME: Friday, 29th April 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 818 3241 2695, Password: 03002187).

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ABSTRACT.

Dr. Prasad Paradkar (CSIRO) will discuss transmission of mosquito-borne viruses and novel technologies currently being used as well as being developed to reduce the impact of these diseases.


BIO.

Prasad Paradkar is a group leader at Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness. His research is focused on vector-borne disease transmission using laboratory and field studies.

He has been involved in development and implementation of novel technologies in reducing the impact of diseases such as dengue in communities. He has published in several high impact journals, collaborating with international teams of scientist.

His previous research was development of animal models of dengue pathogenesis for testing antivirals and vaccines.

Follow Prasad on Twitter for more information.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: The ecology and niche segregation of diving petrels

SPEAKER: Aymeric Formant, Deakin University and CEBC (La Rochelle University, France)

DATE & TIME: Thursday, 14th April 2022 @ 4pm.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 818 2563 5734, Password: 98853504).

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ABSTRACT.

Exploring a species’ ecological niche entails investigation through multiple scales, as different environmental threats and niche constraints between intra-species levels may lead to important ecological and conservation consequences. However, the absence of precise information about small species ecology has greatly limited ecological niche modelling studies, directly impacting our ability to delineate proper conservation planning. Technological advancements in the miniaturisation of data loggers have made it possible to collect ecological data of such species.

In the present study, a multi-tooled approach was used to investigate the ecological niche of two small seabird species, the common and the South-Georgian diving petrels. The primary objectives were to: 1) describe their foraging ecology during the breeding and non-breeding periods, and investigate their inter-annual variations; 2) determine the ecological differences between populations throughout the Southern Ocean; and 3) study the variations in their foraging ecology throughout the entire annual-cycle in the context of niche segregation.

The results demonstrated that diving petrels exhibit remarkable flying abilities despite their high wing loading, foraging over large areas during the breeding season, and migrating several thousands of kilometres from their colony during the post-breeding period. These analyses revealed important ecological differences throughout the species distribution, particularly in terms of phenology and migration area. Collecting data over several years substantially strengthens results and provides valuable information to understand the variations and the limits of diving petrel ecological niches.

Finally, a stage-dependent and context-dependent niche segregation analysis demonstrated the importance of a multi-tooled approach to better describe and understand the co-existence of ecologically similar species.


BIO.

I just finished my PhD about the ecology and niche segregation of diving petrels (small seabirds) in the Southern Ocean, in co-supervision with John Arnould at Deakin, and Charly Bost at La Rochelle University in France.

My main focuses are the foraging ecology, trophic ecology and movement ecology of seabirds and marine mammals, with a particular interest for polar and sub-polar environments.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Impacts of Agriculture on Anurans and Reptiles

SPEAKER: Sara Balouch, Regional Cat Management Coordinator, Ten Lives Australia

DATE & TIME: Friday, 1st April 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 841 4108 4337, Password: 61704291).

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ABSTRACT.

I will give an overview over my PhD research on diversity, threats and conservation of anurans and reptiles in fragmented agricultural landscapes.

Amphibians and reptiles are particularly sensitive to the landscape changes that occur as a result of different agriculture practices.

The major focus of my PhD studies involved understanding the consequences of different agricultural practices on habitat quality and the response of these animals towards these habitat changes.

We conducted our studies in two countries (Australia and Pakistan) with different agricultural practices and landscape contexts to explore the effects of habitat disturbance on herpetofauna in these human altered landscapes.


BIO.

Sara Balouch completed her PhD at Deakin University’s Centre for Integrative Ecology in 2021 and now holds a role as Regional Cat Management Coordinator at Ten Lives Australia.

For her PhD in Prof Don Driscoll’s BRACE lab, she investigated impacts of agriculture on herpetofauna in fragmented landscapes of Australia and Pakistan.

Her work with wildlife spans ten years, first as an assistant curator in Arid Agriculture University, Pakistan and later as a wildlife biologist at Barari Forest Management in the United Arab Emirates.

Follow Sara on Twitter or checkout her website for more information.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Foot-and-mouth disease and its wildlife hosts: it’s a complicated ecology

SPEAKER: Wilna Vosloo, CSIRO-Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (Heath & Biosecurity)

DATE & TIME: Friday, 18th March 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 812 2343 8561, Password: 92465869).

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ABSTRACT.

Highly infectious diseases with the potential to easily cross borders threaten the livestock industries in many countries previously free from disease. Australia has been very successful to prevent the entry of diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), African swine fever and lumpy skin disease.

However, all these have recently expanded their geographical distribution or dominant lineages of viruses have been displaced. Many of these diseases have a complex interaction with specific wildlife hosts that ensure the maintenance of the disease and are therefore very difficult to control and eradicate.

This seminar will focus on FMD virus and interactions with its wildlife hosts in Africa, extrapolate to feral animals in Australia and the threat of maintenance should FMD be introduced.


BIO.

Wilna Vosloo is a senior principal research scientist at the CSIRO-Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness in Geelong. For the last 30 years her research has focused on transboundary animal diseases that not only have the potential to infect livestock species, but have wildlife maintenance hosts that make the control of these diseases very complex and eradication near impossible. Two such examples are foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever.

Currently she is a group leader of five teams looking at Disease Mitigation Technologies and is responsible for the FMD research programme at AAHL. She also works extensively internationally to ensure Australia plays a global role in the control of FMD.

Wilna serves as one of 6 international members on the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) FMD ad hoc Group on the Evaluation of FMD Status of Member Countries and serves on the Executive Committee of the Global FMD Research Alliance. She also serves on the Vaccine Expert Advisory Group and Vaccine Bank Contract Committee in Australia.

For more information about FMD click HERE.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: What is required to recover all of Australia’s threatened species, and how much will this cost?

SPEAKER: Dr April Reside, Lecturer, School of Agriculture & Food Sciences, The University of Queensland

DATE & TIME: Friday, 4th March 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 822 3417 6488, Password: 53064174).

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ABSTRACT.

Despite Australia’s high extinction record, threatened species recovery is inadequately funded compared to other nations. Further, Australia lacks an estimate of the budget required to turn this trajectory around.

Here we provide the first continental scale assessment of the actions and resources needed to achieve recovery of all threatened species across the nation. We estimate the scale of threat management that would benefit threatened species across Australia, and investigate how recovery actions compare in the number of species benefited, and extent they are required.

We developed 18 threat abatement strategies to address all the threats to 1,659 threatened terrestrial and freshwater species. Using mechanistic cost models, we costed out the implementation of these threat abatement strategies.

Managing weeds had the greatest total implementation cost, making up 69% of the total. The benefits from this set of threat abatement strategies extend far beyond the threatened species that need them, including jobs, benefit to the agricultural industry and carbon sequestration.


BIO.

April is a lecturer in the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences at the University of Queensland. She focusses on the conservation of threatened species, conservation planning and climate change adaptation. She also has a particular fondness for flying vertebrates.

April is the chair of the Black-throated Finch Recovery Team, and a member of Birdlife Australia’s Research and Conservation Committee, and Threatened Species Committee.

Follow April on Twitter.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Biodiversity sensitive urban design

SPEAKER: Professor Sarah Bekessy, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University

DATE & TIME: Friday, 18th February 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 846 9118 4848, Password: 09485425).

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ABSTRACT.

For the last decade, we have been working with a wide range of stakeholders to implement and test our protocol for ‘biodiversity sensitive urban design’.

I’ll report back on our ambition to mainstream the approach, providing some insights into our wins and setbacks, and highlighting where advances in ecological knowledge are still desperately needed.


BIO.

Professor Sarah Bekessy leads the ICON Science research group at RMIT University which uses interdisciplinary approaches to solve complex biodiversity conservation problems.

She is particularly interested in understanding the role of human behaviour in conservation and in designing cities to encourage ‘every day nature’ experiences.

She co-developed the Biodiversity Sensitive Urban Design protocol that has now been used by numerous developers, governments and non-government organisations to design innovative urban biodiversity strategies.

Follow Sarah on Twitter.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness – An overview and view to the future

SPEAKER: Dr Debbie Eagles, Deputy Director, CSIRO Australia Centre for Disease Preparedness

DATE & TIME: Friday, 21st January 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 843 9036 8499, Password: 73907723).

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ABSTRACT.

My presentation will give an overview of the work done at CSIRO’s Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness and outline future direction, including in areas contributing to wildlife health and opportunities for collaboration.

Recent research on new and emerging diseases in our region, including African Swine Fever and African Horse Sickness as well as ongoing threats such as Avian Influenza will also be highlighted.


BIO.

Debbie Eagles has been Deputy Director of CSIRO’s Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (ACDP), previously known as the Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL), since July 2019. Prior to this she spent 3 years in the role of ACDP’s Research Director for the Diagnosis, Surveillance and Response (DSR) Program which followed 8 years in the Veterinary Diagnostic Team.

ACDP is the national reference laboratory for exotic and emergency animal diseases, including zoonotics and holds a number of World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and FAO reference/collaborating centre designations. Debbie herself is an OIE Reference Laboratory Expert on Bluetongue Virus, which was the focus of her PhD thesis.

Debbie is also enrolled as an OIE and Australian Qualified Expert on the UN Secretary-General Mechanism’s (UNSGM) Roster for investigations of Alleged Use of Chemical, Biological or Toxin Weapons, has postgraduate qualifications in epidemiology and has a special interest in interactions at the field/laboratory interface.

Debbie has extensive experience in working in the Asia Pacific region, including in laboratory capacity building projects, in field investigations and through the provision of training courses.

Follow Debbie on LinkedIn.


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