CIE Seminar Series 2022: A strategic communication approach to biodiversity conservation

SPEAKER: Dr. Emily Gregg, RMIT University.

DATE & TIME: Friday 19th August 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 812 5556 2274, Password: 89428618).

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ABSTRACT.

Effective communication is a key component of behaviour change interventions for biodiversity, yet the evidence base for conservation messaging is still relatively novel and often context specific. Moving from more traditional science communication approaches to public engagement strategies that draw from communication disciplines (e.g., social marketing, advertising, public relations etc.) also raises potential ethical considerations that may be unfamiliar to conservation professionals. So how can we plan and design conservation messaging that is strategic, ethical, and effective?

In this talk I draw from my PhD research to explore how a strategic communications approach can assist with the planning and design of conservation messaging (and present some practical tips!). Specifically, I discuss ethical considerations for messaging, barriers to public and stakeholder engagement, and the use of strategic message framing and narratives.

I draw from specific examples, including work focused on kangaroo management, strategic name changes of species common names, and how we talk about nature and COVID-19. While the complexity of communication planning poses a challenge, it also provides conservation scientists with a unique opportunity to employ new approaches to public and stakeholder engagement. By drawing from the social sciences, and taking a strategic and targeted approach, conservation scientists can plan, design, and share more effective messages for nature conservation


BIO.

Emily is an ecologist turned conservation social scientist, with a particular interest in strategic communication planning and design. She has recently submitted her PhD thesis working within the ICON Science research group at RMIT University.

Emily is passionate about applying knowledge from communication studies and other social sciences (e.g., behaviour change, social marketing, conservation psychology, ecolinguistics) to improve outcomes for the environment and people.

Follow Emily on Twitter.


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CIE Seminar Series 2022: The realm of snakes – hearing & airborne sounds

SPEAKER: Dr. Christina Zdenek, Venom Evolution Lab, University of Queensland.

DATE & TIME: Friday 5th August 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 836 1059 6997, Password: 06584066).

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ABSTRACT.

Evidence suggests that snakes can hear, but how snakes naturally respond to airborne sound is still unclear. We conducted 304 trials on 19 snakes across five genera, observing the effects of airborne sounds on snake behaviour, compared to controls.

All snake responses were strongly genus dependent. Only one genus (Woma Pythons) significantly increased their probability of movement in response to sound, but three other genera (death adders, taipans, and brown snakes) were more likely to move away from sound, signaling potential avoidance behavior. Taipans significantly increased their likelihood of displaying defensive and cautious behaviors in response to sound, but three of the five genera exhibited significantly different types of behaviors in sound trials compared to the control.

Our results highlight potential heritable behavioral responses of snakes to airborne sound, clustered within genera. Our study illustrates the variability among different snake genera, and across sound frequencies, contributing to our limited understanding of snake behaviour.


BIO.

Dr Christina Zdenek is a biologist, toxicologist, and a 2021 ABC Top 5 Scientist. She manages the Venom Evolution Lab at The University of Queensland.

Her passion for snakes began as a child, when her family pet was a 2.5-metre boa constrictor snake. Her research focuses on the systemic effects of animal venoms, as well as the ecology and behaviour of snakes.

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CIE Seminar Series 2022: Responsible agri-food consumption and production patterns & Food production and dietary nutrient gaps

DATE & TIME: Friday 22nd July 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 812 5556 2274, Password: 89428618).

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ABSTRACT.

Dr. Özge Geyik: Food systems are at the core of the sustainable development goals (SDGs). The synchronous epidemics of malnutrition (undernutrition, overnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies) and climate change, the so-called global syndemic, poses a growing threat around the world. In this thesis, I developed a multidimensional dataset which combines highly disaggregate primary food production and trade data with population-level dietary nutrient requirements.

I showed that while total food production has kept pace with the growing population and has been able to provide the global population with adequate energy, protein, iron, zinc, folate, and vitamin B12; up to 40% of the population live in countries with inadequate nutrient supplies. I found that current food production and trade patterns result in dietary nutrient gaps, particularly for countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, I linked my dataset with corresponding agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and quantify the minimum emissions associated with closing the nutrient gap.

My findings suggest that context-specific and climate friendly food baskets, together with enhanced agricultural productivity and reduced food loss and waste, could help close the nutrient gap within the emissions budget compatible with the Paris Agreement.

Abdullah Shaikh: The agri-food system is a major driver of natural resource use and contributes to the exceedance of several key environmental limits such as the land-system change and the freshwater use planetary boundaries. Under the Sustainable Development Goal 12, countries need to determine whether the environmental impacts of national agri-food consumption and production are within their own national environmental limits to achieve responsible consumption and production. However, little is known about the linkages between domestic consumption and trade of agri-food commodities and their joint impact on both national and global environmental limits.

This thesis explored responsible agri-food consumption and production patterns of countries in the context of virtual flows of cropland and freshwater footprints embedded in the trade of agri-food commodities. It extended the existing literature by explicitly delineating the shared responsibility of countries towards their domestic and international cropland and freshwater resources.

The findings informed consumer countries about the opportunities for reducing their global impact of agri-food consumption through co-investments in countries with high potential to increase production and water-use efficiencies.


BIO.

About Özge: Özge is a postdoctoral researcher in the Sustainable Food Systems research group, University of Göttingen, Germany. She completed her PhD studies on sustainable and nutrition-sensitive food systems at the Planet-A Lab, Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Australia.

With a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering and a master’s degree in industrial ecology, she has a wide variety of interests and professional experiences in projects involving life cycle sustainability assessments, sustainable agriculture, and industrial symbiosis. She enjoys environmental accounting of consumer decisions

Follow Dr. Ozge Geyik on Twitter.

About Abdullah: Abdullah Shaikh has research experience in the planetary boundary, environmental footprint, and agri-food space. Before his PhD, he did his master’s in industrial and System Engineering and researched on the water footprints of electricity production.

He is currently working as an eResearch Analyst and supports the research infrastructure at the University of New South Wales. He provides training, one-to-one consultation, HPC and Cloud computing support to the researchers of UNSW. He uses his research experience and skillset to assist researchers with their projects.

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CIE’s Wild Webinars 2022 – An army of claw-some friends

Deakin University’s Centre for Integrative Ecology presents its Wild Webinars 2022 on-line public seminar series. The series brings exciting science stories live into your evening. Kick back and be regaled by the latest discoveries in ecology, conservation, evolution and sustainability presented by CIE’s leading research experts.

Every winter, in the heart of Port Phillip Bay, a truly amazing natural phenomenon unravels: the gathering of thousands and thousands of great spider crabs. Those crabs, which come to the shallows together to seek safety in numbers are on a mission: in order to grow, they need to moult whilst dodging hungry rays and other predators. The spider crabs and their aggregations have been featured across the world – Sir David Attenborough himself featured this extraordinary event in BBC Blue Planet II.

But would you believe that despite all this attention, we know very little about spider crab biology and ecology? Elodie and her team at Deakin University are here to change that and they need your help! Elodie will tell you all about how you can take the plunge, and become the spider crabs’ friends by helping scientists gather information on their whereabouts to understand their aggregations better.

The Spider Crab Watch Citizen Science program is seeking the help of everyone, from recreational fishermen, divers, charter tour operators and boating enthusiasts to join ‘Spider Crab Watch’ so that data can be collated to work out not only why the amazing natural phenomenon happens, but also where and when it’s happening.

About Elodie: Elodie holds a PhD from Deakin University on seabird ecology, following degrees in marine biology and ecology, studying across Europe, the US and Madagascar working with fishermen and dugongs. Elodie led the Remember The Wild initiative aimed at fostering stewardship for Naarm (Port Phillip Bay) and its connected waterways. Elodie now works with the Blue Carbon Lab as project manager and science communicator, and as a Research Fellow at Deakin University, working on great spider aggregations within Naarm.

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Find more information about CIE’s Wild Webinars 2022 HERE.

CIE Seminar Series 2022: Microbiomes in vegetated coastal ecosystems: From disease to decomposition

DATE & TIME: Friday 8th July 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 813 0275 8867, Password: 01175415).

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ABSTRACT.

My research applies biogeochemical and microbiological techniques to improve the fundamental understanding of carbon cycling and microbial ecology in coastal and freshwater ecosystems in the context of global climate change and ecosystem health and restoration.

My talk will highlight some of the research projects from the past few years in the CIE, including various studies on the microbes associated with seagrasses, the global initiative TeaComposition H2O, and upcoming projects on wetland restoration.


BIO.

After receiving her Master’s degree in the US on seagrass disease, Stacey moved to Sydney to complete her PhD on seagrass (blue) carbon cycling. In 2015, she moved to Deakin and Blue Carbon Lab where she has worked on a diverse range of projects, including carbon cycling coastal and freshwater wetlands, microbiomes, and seagrass disease.

As an ARC DECRA Fellow, Stacey is using decomposition and microbiomes to investigate the drivers of soil function in natural and restored wetlands around the world.

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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Buruli ulcer: an Australian zoonosis?

DATE & TIME: Friday 24th June 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 813 0275 8867, Password: 01175415).

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ABSTRACT.

In recent years reported cases of Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), have increased substantially in Victoria, Australia, with the epidemic also expanding geographically. Previous studies suggest that BU may be a zoonotic disease in Australia, but how this pathogen circulates in the environment and transmits to humans is still poorly understood.

Here I will discuss the role animals and vectors may play in the environmental circulation of MU and will present findings from a recent case-control study. Using questionnaires and environmental sampling, this study aimed to identify behavioural and environmental risk factors by analysing data collected from recent BU cases and postcode-matched controls and their respective residential properties. The findings from this study provide further support for the hypothesis that MU is zoonotic in Victoria, with ringtail possums the strongest reservoir host candidate.


BIO.

Kim Blasdell is an infectious disease scientist with a focus on zoonotic viruses. Her initial studies were in Zoology at the university of Liverpool, where she conducted an honours project on the shedding behaviour of snakes. After graduation she undertook a PhD at the same institution, studying the rodent-borne viruses, LCMV and cowpox virus, in their natural hosts.

Her first position after this was as the research coordinator for Frontier’s Cambodian project, which saw her living in the jungle for a year supervising volunteers and conducting biodiversity assessments. After some time spent travelling she returned to Cambodia as a postdoc at the Institut Pasteur du Cambodge. Her focus this time was on rodent-borne pathogens in rapidly changing environments. As part of this project she identified two novel arenaviruses, one of which was tentatively associated with disease in humans.

Kim moved to CSIRO to start her second postdoc in 2010, changing her research focus to arboviruses, particularly those affecting cattle. During this time she developed her skills in NGS and characterised several little known arboviruses. On completion of this project she continued at CSIRO as a research scientist, continuing to study livestock-associated arboviruses, but also returning to rodent-borne viruses.In conjunction with Dr Cadhla Firth (now at EcoHealth), she recently conducted a project looking at the impact of urbanisation on rodent-borne pathogens.

Her current research focus is on understanding the ecology and potential transmission routes of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the agent of Buruli ulcer, and on the ecology of several vector-borne diseases.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: ACDP Avian Virology lab – what we do and High Path Avian Flu in Australia & The pathogenesis of HPAIV in surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)

DATE & TIME: Friday 27th May 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 857 4842 0333, Password: 80150153).

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ABSTRACT.

Dr. Jeff Butler will present his talk on “ACDP Avian Virology lab – what we do and High Path Avian Flu in Australia”. From Jeff: “In this talk I will provide a short overview of the work we do in the Avian Virology Diagnostic lab at ACDP followed by an overview of the threat posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) to the Australian poultry industry and some of the work we do on HPAI in our laboratory.”

Dr. Jasmina Luczo will present her talk on “The pathogenesis of HPAIV in surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)”. From Jasmina: “Surf scoters are large diving sea ducks native to North America, with breeding grounds situated in the boreal tundra transitional zone across northern Canada and Alaska, and wintering areas located on both the east and west coasts of continental USA. The geographical distribution of surf scoters overlaps that of migratory birds known to transmit HPAIVs. Consequently, it is important to understand the potential role of surf scoters in HPAIV spread and evolution.”


BIO.

Jeff Butler is the Team Leader of the Diagnostic Virology Group at the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness in Geelong. His role is to coordinate the work of his team members in the Avian and Mammalian Virology Laboratories which primarily includes routine diagnostic testing of exotic avian and mammalian viral diseases (e.g. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, Newcastle Disease, Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, Hendra/Nipah Virus, Foot and Mouth Disease Virus, Bluetongue Virus, Australian Bat Lyssavirus, African Swine Fever, Classical Swine Fever and many other viruses). Jeff maintains a current research interest in the characterization of emerging Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza viruses. He also has particular interests in Australian Avian Influenza viruses and, investigating the adaptation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza viruses to mammals, which was the focus of his PhD.

From Jasmina: I am a virologist at the Australian Centre of Disease Preparedness. My research interests include the pathogenesis of HPAIV in avian species, virulence determinants of HPAIV, and the functional evolution of avian influenza viruses.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Biodiversity Indicators (PhD Seminar)

DATE & TIME: Friday 13th May 2022 @ 12pm.

LOCATION: Via Zoom and in-person at Room T3.22, Burwood campus. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 869 7351 6052, Password: 91401926).

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ABSTRACT.

The reality of global biodiversity loss is vast, highly complex, and difficult to comprehend. Biodiversity indicators are policy tools designed to distill this complexity into digestible forms useful for decision making.

The development of terrestrial indicators is still in its infancy however, and many indicators, such as the Red List Index, are deployed with little knowledge about whether they are fit for intended purpose. In fisheries science and economics, indicators are often subjected to more rigorous performance testing to establish their strengths and limitations in different contexts.

My PhD research aimed to translate some of these concepts and methods to the world of terrestrial biodiversity indicators.

This seminar will highlight some key results that can inform the effective use of terrestrial indicators, which are particularly relevant to upcoming negotiations on the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework under the Convention on Biological Diversity.


BIO.

Simone completed her PhD research on biodiversity indicators in the Deakin Conservation Science Lab, led by Prof Emily Nicholson, submitting her thesis in late 2021. Prior to her PhD she worked on international marine policy for the Pacific Islands Forum.

Simone is now working as a postdoc for the Deakin Marine Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab led by Dr. Eric Treml, where she is working on developing quantitative tools for managing marine biosecurity risk in New Zealand.

Follow Simone on Twitter for more information.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: Vector-borne diseases: an integrated approach

SPEAKER: Dr. Prasad Paradkar (CSIRO)

DATE & TIME: Friday, 29th April 2022 @ 12noon.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 818 3241 2695, Password: 03002187).

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ABSTRACT.

Dr. Prasad Paradkar (CSIRO) will discuss transmission of mosquito-borne viruses and novel technologies currently being used as well as being developed to reduce the impact of these diseases.


BIO.

Prasad Paradkar is a group leader at Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness. His research is focused on vector-borne disease transmission using laboratory and field studies.

He has been involved in development and implementation of novel technologies in reducing the impact of diseases such as dengue in communities. He has published in several high impact journals, collaborating with international teams of scientist.

His previous research was development of animal models of dengue pathogenesis for testing antivirals and vaccines.

Follow Prasad on Twitter for more information.


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CIE Seminar Series – 2022: The ecology and niche segregation of diving petrels

SPEAKER: Aymeric Formant, Deakin University and CEBC (La Rochelle University, France)

DATE & TIME: Thursday, 14th April 2022 @ 4pm.

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect (Meeting ID: 818 2563 5734, Password: 98853504).

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ABSTRACT.

Exploring a species’ ecological niche entails investigation through multiple scales, as different environmental threats and niche constraints between intra-species levels may lead to important ecological and conservation consequences. However, the absence of precise information about small species ecology has greatly limited ecological niche modelling studies, directly impacting our ability to delineate proper conservation planning. Technological advancements in the miniaturisation of data loggers have made it possible to collect ecological data of such species.

In the present study, a multi-tooled approach was used to investigate the ecological niche of two small seabird species, the common and the South-Georgian diving petrels. The primary objectives were to: 1) describe their foraging ecology during the breeding and non-breeding periods, and investigate their inter-annual variations; 2) determine the ecological differences between populations throughout the Southern Ocean; and 3) study the variations in their foraging ecology throughout the entire annual-cycle in the context of niche segregation.

The results demonstrated that diving petrels exhibit remarkable flying abilities despite their high wing loading, foraging over large areas during the breeding season, and migrating several thousands of kilometres from their colony during the post-breeding period. These analyses revealed important ecological differences throughout the species distribution, particularly in terms of phenology and migration area. Collecting data over several years substantially strengthens results and provides valuable information to understand the variations and the limits of diving petrel ecological niches.

Finally, a stage-dependent and context-dependent niche segregation analysis demonstrated the importance of a multi-tooled approach to better describe and understand the co-existence of ecologically similar species.


BIO.

I just finished my PhD about the ecology and niche segregation of diving petrels (small seabirds) in the Southern Ocean, in co-supervision with John Arnould at Deakin, and Charly Bost at La Rochelle University in France.

My main focuses are the foraging ecology, trophic ecology and movement ecology of seabirds and marine mammals, with a particular interest for polar and sub-polar environments.


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