CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Faster, taller, more – patterns and drivers of plant community change on high-alpine mountain summits

SPEAKER: Dr Sonja Wipf, WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, Switzerland

DATE: Friday, 22nd March 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

(Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

Climate warming is one of the most prominent driver of community change in regions relatively unaffected by direct human impact. The largely pristine high altitude and high latitude regions of the N hemisphere are warming at much higher rates than the global average.

To investigate how and at which rates global changes affected European high-altitude plant communities over the past century, we assembled a long-term (>100 years) dataset of plant community re-surveys on over 300 European mountain summits. I will present how high-alpine plant communities changed in richness and functional composition, which types of species are prone to local extinctions, and how changes relate to different climate change drivers.

RESEARCH INTERESTS.

Due to the narrow climatic constraints, the strong environmental gradients and the relative naturalness, alpine and arctic ecosystems have been a major playground for generations of researchers. My research deals with the impacts of climate change, agriculture and tourism on alpine and arctic plants and soils, and the interaction between the two.

CURRICULUM.

since 2017: Senior Researcher (currently 50%), team “Mountain Ecosystems” at WSL/SLF Davos

since 2010: Research associate, team “Mountain Ecosystems” at WSL/SLF Davos

2008-2010: PostDoc (75%), Soil Biogeochemistry Group, WSL Birmensdorf

2007-2008: PostDoc, The James Hutton Institute (former Macaulay Institute), Aberdeen, Scotland UK

ppointments with speaker may be made via Susanna Venn (susanna.venn@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.wsl.ch/de/mitarbeitende/wipf.html

 

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Fox hunting for conservation? Grouse, red foxes and the effectiveness of predator control

SPEAKER: Jim-Lino Kämmerle, Visiting PhD student, Wildlife Ecology and Management, University of Freiburg, Germany

DATE: Friday, 8th March 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre.

(Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room) and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is a mammalian mesopredator with global relevance for conservation and often subject to control efforts. One such example comes from grouse conservation in the forest-farmland mosaic landscapes of Europe. Although not threatened at a global scale, many Central European grouse populations are red-listed and suffer from low reproductive success. Predators of eggs and chicks, especially generalist predators that benefit from landscape fragmentation, have been implicated in this development. While intensive control of predator abundance can benefit prey populations, in practice the effectiveness of predator control is rarely quantified, contesting the appropriateness of predator control as a conservation measure. Our current research focusses on this topic, zooming in on a declining remnant population of capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) in the Black Forest, Germany. We first assessed how range contractions of capercaillie in the area may be linked to landscape configuration and predator abundance before looking at potential pathways, the suitability of predator control as a conservation tool and the effectiveness of the currently applied restricted-area culling in lowering fox abundance and predation pressure by foxes.

BIO. Lino is currently with the Chair of Wildlife Ecology and Management at the University of Freiburg in south-western Germany, where he is completing his PhD on the effectiveness of restricted-area fox culls while also conducting a research project with a wider focus. Apart from his doctorate work, Lino works for the State Forest Research Institute (FVA-BW) as a data analyst in a research project studying the effects of wind turbine development on capercaillie. Lino holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Science and a Bachelor in Wildlife Management. He is interested in applied ecological research with practical relevance at the interface of people and wildlife.

Appointments with guest speaker may be made via Euan Ritchie (e.ritchie@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.wildlife.uni-freiburg.de/en/Staff/kaemmerle