CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Vision in the ocean: a comparison of animals with and without legs


Dear CIE staff and students in Geelong,

This week’s CIE seminar will be given by ARC Laureate fellow Professor Justin Marshall (details below) and hosted by Professor Andy Bennett.

Justin will be at the Waurn Ponds campus from about 11am on Friday and will be around for lunch and dinner.

You are welcome to attend these meals but please let Natasha Kaukov (natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au) know no later than 1500 on Thursday, 18th July so I can book for the right numbers.

If you wish to book an appointment to talk to Justin during the day, then please also contact Natasha.

Friday, 19th July: 1200 noon, Lunch at Natural-1 café, GTP Building, Waurn Ponds campus (note: staff will need to pay for their own lunch).

Friday, 19th July: 1830 Dinner at Real Thai Café, 12/14 Pearl St, Torquay

Friday, 19th July: 2115 onwards, beer at Blackman’s Brewery, 26 Bell Street, Torquay.


SPEAKER: Professor Justin Marshall, ARC Laureate Fellow, Sensory Neurobiology Group, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland

DATE: Friday, 19th July 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room).

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

ABSTRACT.

Animals that live in aquatic environments face different challenges to those that live on land. First of all, it is wet and that means that optics to focus need to be internalized and not reliant on an air-eyeball interphase.

There are no eagles underwater, or indeed any animal that might need to spot things at a great distance as it is not possible to see beyond a few meters due to the absorption and scatter of light. In fact, the visual world many aquatic species seldom strays outside the range of a large goldfish bowl.

The attenuation of light by water also changes its colour and its polarization content and this talk will focus on these two aspects of difference to terrestrial-world. From animals with 20 channels of information (12 spectral, 6 polarisation and 2 for B&W) to those with 2; fish, crustaceans and cephalopods will be compared for visual capability, colours, camouflage and any other word beginning with C that the audience might like to suggest. Confusion might be one, and indeed there is a fair bit of it to talk about.

BIO.

Much of the work in my laboratory within The Queensland Brain Institute focusses on the marine environment, in particular reef systems and the deep-sea. One label for what we do is neuroscience in the real world; that is, we examine neural function and vision in animal systems that are not the usual model systems. I am more interested in the retinal design of a mantis shrimp than a mouse and the brain design of an octopus than a rat.

As part of this effort I have become acutely aware of man’s influence on both these environments and have run two projects: The Deep Australia Project, and CoralWatch, the world’s largest citizen-science-based coral health assessment program (137 countries, 12 languages) that examine, educate and involve everyone in these very different habitats.

My research efforts fall into six areas:

  1. Vision in stomatopod (mantis shrimp) – the world’s most complex visual system.
  2. Reef fish vision – the evolution and diversity of colour vision.
  3. Cephalopod vision and behaviour – complex visual capability in invertebrates.
  4. The Deep Australia Project – unlocking the sensory systems of the abyss.
  5. Coral Watch – using colour to save the reef.
  6. Bio-inspired sensor design and applications from reef-vision.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Natasha Kaukov (natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://coralwatch.org/index.php/about/our-team-and-supporters/.

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: The genomic basis of explosive speciation

SPEAKER: Dr Matthew McGee, Head, Behavioural Studies Research Group, ARC DECRA Fellow, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University

DATE: Friday, 12th July 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room).

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

ABSTRACT.

Rates of speciation vary tremendously among evolutionary lineages and our understanding of the factors facilitating the very rapid speciation seen within species flocks remains incomplete.

Here, we examine the extrinsic and intrinsic factors promoting speciation within the cichlid fishes, a tropical freshwater group known for their exceptional diversity.

We analyze cichlids on a macroevolutionary scale using a large complete phylogeny of all described species, as well as a microevolutionary scale using one hundred whole genomes of the Lake Victoria species flock, which has the fastest sustained speciation rate in vertebrates.

BIO.

My lab uses whole genomic sequencing, phylogenetic comparative methods, and functional experiments to study the factors governing speciation, adaptation, and extinction, with an emphasis on fishes.

I received my PhD at the University of California Davis, then did my postdoc with Ole Seehausen at University of Bern.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Larry Croft (l.croft@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.monash.edu/science/schools/biological-sciences/staff/matt-mcgee.

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Behavioural responses to a changing world: evolutionary and ecological consequences

SPEAKER: Professsor Bob Wong, Head, Behavioural Ecology Research Group/Deputy Head of School, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University

DATE: Friday, 28th June 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room).

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

Humans have brought about unprecedented changes to environments worldwide. For many species, behavioural adjustments represent the first response to altered conditions. Such behavioural modifications can potentially improve an organism’s prospects of surviving and reproducing in a rapidly changing world.

However, not all behavioural responses are beneficial. Human-altered conditions, for instance, can undermine the reliability of sexual signals used by animals to assess potential suitors. Environmental changes can also impair sensory systems or interfere with physiological processes needed to mount an appropriate behavioural response. An understanding of behaviour could therefore be important in helping to explain why some species are able to survive, or even flourish, under human altered conditions, while others flounder.

In this talk, I will consider the pivotal role that behaviour plays in determining the fate of species under human-induced environmental change, and discuss recent research in my Group investigating the impacts of anthropogenic change on behaviour in fish.

BIO.

Bob Wong is a behavioural and evolutionary ecologist based in the School of Biological Sciences at Monash University. Bob received his PhD from the Australian National University and completed postdoctoral stints at Boston University and the University of Helsinki before joining Monash.

Research in Bob’s Group focuses on mate choice and reproductive investment, and how human-induced environmental change affects animal behaviour. Work undertaken in the group encompasses a wide range of species, from insects and cephalopods to birds and fish.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Natasha Kaukov (natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.monash.edu/science/schools/biological-sciences/staff/wong.

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Outsmarting the feral cat: reducing predation impacts on Australia’s threatened mammals

SPEAKER: Dr Katherine Moseby, Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales

DATE: Friday, 21st June 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre.

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Warrnambool Campus – room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

Feral cats are implicated in the extinction of 30 mammal species and the decline of over 100 threatened fauna in Australia. There are an estimated 3 million feral cats in Australia and they occupy every habitat type.

Re-establishing our native mammals back into the wild is a challenge when predation is the leading cause of reintroduction failure. In response, we protect threatened mammals inside fenced reserves and on islands where cats are excluded.

I discuss how innovative research is finding new ways to reduce predation impacts through harnessing natural selection, understanding hunting behaviour and altering habitat. These methods may allow widespread recovery of our unique mammals beyond the fence.

BIO.

Katherine Moseby is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Ecosystem Science at UNSW and considers herself a transdisciplinary conservation biologist. She lives on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia where she owns and manages a private nature reserve and is also co-founder of three other conservation research initiatives, Wild Deserts (NSW), Arid Recovery (SA) and Tetepare Island (Solomon Islands).

Katherine conducts research designed to improve conservation outcomes through understanding the ecology of threatened species and their threats.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Tim Doherty (timothy.doherty@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.ecosystem.unsw.edu.au/people/katherine-moseby.

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: In living colour: Why do colours change across life stages?

SPEAKER: Dr Iliana Rocio Medina Guzman, McKenzie Postdoctoral Fellow, School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, University of Melbourne

DATE: Friday, 14th June 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207.

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood – Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

Many insects change colour during ontogeny and, in some, this can be explained by different selective pressures acting on highly dissimilar adult and larval forms. However, some insects, such as many true bugs (Heteroptera), retain similar body shape and share similar predators and habitats through ontogeny. Many of these species also release defensive secretions which are advertised with bright colours, and are thus considered aposematic.

In this talk I will present the most recent results on two projects related to this question. We use a comparative approach and predation experiments to understand what drives the evolution of colour changes in butterflies and in bugs.

BIO.

Iliana completed her Undergrad and Masters at the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia, where she studied evolution of colour in poison frogs. In 2012 she moved to Australia to complete her PhD at the Australian National University. She then moved to Melbourne as a McKenzie Fellow.

Iliana’s main interest is the macroevolution of animal behaviour and coloration, and she uses phylogenetic comparative methods in combination with field and lab experiments to answer broad questions in ecology.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Matthew Symonds (matthew.symonds@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/individuals/dr-iliana-medina

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Modelling Transitions to Sustainability

SPEAKER: Dr Fjalar de Haan, Research Fellow, Sustainability Transitions, The University of Melbourne

DATE: Friday, 31st May 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Warrnambool Campus – room J2.19 (Fishbowl).

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

Modelling Transitions – Overview and Future Avenues:

Transitions are structural changes in goods and service provision systems, such as health care, transport and energy. We need to understand transitions for two main reasons: (1) to overcome the sustainability issues produced by the current systems, and (2) to deal with the transitions that we are facing whether we want it or not.

Within sustainability transitions research, computational and mathematical modelling has been a consistent, if small, niche. I will present an overview of research done under the banner of transitions modelling, with an emphasis on work I have been involved in myself. In addition to this I will also discuss the challenges ahead for transitions modelling, including the potential of data-driven analysis.

BIO.

Fjalar de Haan is a theoretician, developing computational and mathematical approaches for a scientific understanding of transitions to sustainability. Fjalar has an MSc in theoretical physics (Leiden University) and did his PhD on transitions (Erasmus University).

He has been exploring the fringe of transitions theory and modelling in a variety of sectoral contexts including health care, urban water management and energy, as part of international, interdisciplinary teams, project-based with industry, and in curiosity-driven solo projects. Fjalar currently is Lecturer – Sustainability Transitions at the Melbourne School of Design, The University of Melbourne.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Enayat A. Moallemi, e.moallemi@deakin.edu.au or Brett Bryan, b.bryan@deakin.edu.au.

.

For more info: https://msd.unimelb.edu.au/about/our-people/academic/fjalar-de-haan.

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Life in Glass Houses – Marine and freshwater travels with silica

SPEAKER: Associate Professor Erica Young, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

DATE: Friday, 24th May 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Warrnambool Campus, Room G1.01 (Percy Baxter LT)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

This talk will present an overview of Si biogeochemistry in aquatic ecosystems. The availability of silica can help structure aquatic phytoplankton communities with Si-requiring diatoms being an abundant and important group supporting food webs in marine and freshwater communities. Lake Michigan is a large freshwater lake within the Great Lakes which is showing long term increases in Si over the last decade. This cannot be explained in terms of changes to inputs, or changing Si demand by diatoms.

This talk with present some of our research to better understand Si cycling in the Lake, and to define the ‘players’ in freshwater Si cycles. Comparisons will be made with recent work on Si incorporation and labelling in marine macroalgae and phytoplankton species in Tasmania.

BIO.

Erica completed a BS with first class honors in Botany at University of Western Australia before heading to Sweden to work with symbiotic cyanobacteria. She returned to Monash University for a PhD in microalgal physiology of photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism. After a post-doc in Ireland working on large kelps, she moved to University of Wisconsin on the shores of Lake Michigan.

Her current research spans microbial biodiversity and community analysis, nutrient transformations by key enzyme activities in algal and microbial communities, to biogeochemical cycling of macronutrients in lakes, ponds and coastal oceans. Recent work on silica cycling has brought her to Hobart for a sabbatical at Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at University of Tasmania.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Aleica Bellgrove (aleica.bellgrove@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://uwm.edu/biology/people/young-erica/.

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Economic evaluation of emissions reduction fund incentive for land use change, emissions offset and additional co-benefits

SPEAKER: Professor Jeff Connor, Professor of Water Economics, Centre for Sustainability Governance, University of South Australia, Adelaide

DATE: Friday, 3rd May 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

One of the main mechanisms in Australia’s Commonwealth climate change policy is the Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF). It is an auction where prescribed actions that reduce or offset CO2 emissions can be offered in tender rounds and least cost per tonne CO2 offset offers are funded. Whilst activities across the economy such as building energy efficiency, land fill methane emissions reduction are possible, most credits issued through the ERF to date involved avoided deforestation (17 percent of registered credits) and assisted natural regeneration of native vegetation (64 percent of registered credits (Evans, 2018). Further credits were very concentrated in one part of northern New South Wales and southern Queensland where the removal of stock from low economic return, open forest/grazing land to acquire carbon credits was possible (Evans, 2018). Less than a fraction of one percent of credits came from South Australia intensive agriculture (i.e. areas cleared for broad acre cropping/grazing) representing approximately 10 million hectares (11 percent of South Australia’s area).

Professor Connor will present an overview of a project undertaken in collaboration with the South Australian Government to assess carbon offset supply and co-benefit potential for more future South Australian participation in the ERF. The presentation is in three parts covering the three themes researched for the project. One part provided an informed scientific and economic basis to understand the spatially varying economics of supplying carbon abatement opportunities though land use change across South Australia’s intensive agricultural zone. Another component assessed the often discussed potential that value of co-benefits from carbon plantings in addition to supplying carbon offset markets can provide additional incentives to encourage wider adoption of environmentally and economically beneficial behavior. A final component assessed policy context and stakeholder perceptions to understand how details of implementation of the ERF that may be limiting potential for South Australian landholder participation.

BIO.

Professor Connor specialises in quantitative economic, environmental and social integrated systems modelling often working closely with governments at local, state, national and international levels to provide economic policy advice based on rigorous economics. Jeff worked as an economist and group leader at CSIRO from 2001-2016 where he provided research and advise to the Murray Darling Basin Authority, natural resource management boards and state departments for water, agriculture and natural resource management in South Australia, Victoria, and Western Australia and in Bangladesh, Indonesia, China and Laos. He has secured and/or managed over $6 million worth of externally funded research and published over 60 peer reviewed articles and book chapters in water resource and environmental economics.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Brett Bryan (b.bryan@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jeffery_Connor.

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Climate change and biodiversity – resilience for an uncertain future

SPEAKER: Prof Stephen Williams, College of Science & Engineering, Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD

DATE: Friday, 12th April 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt,then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

The Australian Wet Tropics World Heritage Area is the highest biodiversity region in Australia (45% of all vertebrate species) and was recently described as the second most important World Heritage Area in the world because of the unique concentration of endemic, rare and ancient species. The vertebrate fauna of the Wet Tropics has outstanding and exceptionally high levels of endemism and diversity with the highest concentration in the mountain rainforests.

Unfortunately, the amazing biodiversity of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area is in trouble. Long-term monitoring demonstrates that many species have already declined in both distribution area and population size and these trends are continuing. Declines are particularly obvious in the endemic, rare, ancient and rainforest specialized species that are the key components of the regions outstanding value. Climate change is already causing significant impacts with many species disappearing at the lower elevation, warmer part of their range – Ringtail Possums and approximately 50% of the rainforest birds already show changes in abundance and distribution in accord with expectations associated with climate change. In fact, impacts are happening earlier and faster than predicted. There is a very real potential for significant biodiversity loss, especially of the high conservation value species that the region was originally protected to preserve.

BIO.

I founded the Centre for Tropical Biodiversity & Climate Change research (CTBCC) at James Cook University in 2006 and was the inaugural Director for six years (2006-2012) and subsequently the program leader for the Global Change Program. I was the convenor/director of the NCCARF National Adaptation Research Network – Terrestrial Biodiversity (2009-2013) and then directed the Natural Ecosystems Network under NCCARF II (2014-2017). I was the founding Chair of the IUCN Climate Change & Biodiversity Specialist Group and Chaired the Wet Tropics Management Authority Science Advisory Committee for five years.

My research is focused on understanding biodiversity, assessing the vulnerability of ecosystems to global change and using this knowledge to maximise the positive benefits of natural resource management and policy.

Appointments with speaker may be made via John Endler (john.endler@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/stephen.williams/

 

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Faster, taller, more – patterns and drivers of plant community change on high-alpine mountain summits

SPEAKER: Dr Sonja Wipf, WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, Switzerland

DATE: Friday, 22nd March 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

(Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.

Climate warming is one of the most prominent driver of community change in regions relatively unaffected by direct human impact. The largely pristine high altitude and high latitude regions of the N hemisphere are warming at much higher rates than the global average.

To investigate how and at which rates global changes affected European high-altitude plant communities over the past century, we assembled a long-term (>100 years) dataset of plant community re-surveys on over 300 European mountain summits. I will present how high-alpine plant communities changed in richness and functional composition, which types of species are prone to local extinctions, and how changes relate to different climate change drivers.

RESEARCH INTERESTS.

Due to the narrow climatic constraints, the strong environmental gradients and the relative naturalness, alpine and arctic ecosystems have been a major playground for generations of researchers. My research deals with the impacts of climate change, agriculture and tourism on alpine and arctic plants and soils, and the interaction between the two.

CURRICULUM.

since 2017: Senior Researcher (currently 50%), team “Mountain Ecosystems” at WSL/SLF Davos

since 2010: Research associate, team “Mountain Ecosystems” at WSL/SLF Davos

2008-2010: PostDoc (75%), Soil Biogeochemistry Group, WSL Birmensdorf

2007-2008: PostDoc, The James Hutton Institute (former Macaulay Institute), Aberdeen, Scotland UK

Appointments with speaker may be made via Susanna Venn (susanna.venn@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://www.wsl.ch/de/mitarbeitende/wipf.html