CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Marine microbiomes in host and ecosystem health: how an improved understanding of the microbiome may support industry and environment management in a changing world

SPEAKER: Dr Andrew Oxley, Marine Microbiology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University

DATE: Friday, 13th December 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Although you cannot see them with the naked eye, microbes are everywhere. They are in the air we breathe and on the surfaces we touch. Many also live on and inside us. Collectively, these microbes form complex communities that are shaped from our birth by the environment around us, where they contribute significantly to our health and fitness as what we now refer to as the “Microbiome”.

In the marine environment, microbes are equally as important. Billions of microbes live in each litre of seawater, occur within the sediments, and form intimate relationships with a variety plant and animal life. Each of these individual cells harbours a suite of genes that together outweigh the genomic diversity of their hosts. Marine microbiomes are often highly diverse (comprising an array of species of bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and/or viruses), and play critical roles in driving marine host and ecosystem services.

They are highly adaptive, responding to changes in the environment, support marine animal health, and are a wealth of genetic material that can be exploited for a multitude of applications. In this talk, I will address how recent knowledge gained from studies of the microbiome from various marine hosts can be used to support challenges facing industry and the environment in a changing world.

This will include recent insights into the relevance of the microbiome in: (i) improving the propagation of seagrasses for supporting restoration initiatives; (ii) monitoring and promoting the health and nutrition of commercially important finfish species; and (iii) expanding the dietary range of farmed species for promoting improved tolerance of more environmentally sustainable feeds in the aquaculture industry.

BIO.

Andrew has recently joined SEBE LES as the new Lecturer in Marine Microbiology. His interests in marine microbiology (and microbial ecology more broadly) began at James Cook University, where he completed a Bachelor of Science (Marine Biology) and was awarded a Class I Hons for his work on exploring the bacterial communities associated with wild and cultivated prawns using classical methods.

Having left a lasting impression on him, Andrew moved towards gaining a greater appreciation for the involvement of specific bacterial assemblages within the marine host in undertaking his PhD at the University of New England (UNE) and the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC), where he explored the association of Helicobacter spp. in free-ranging and captive marine mammals, revealing some interesting insights into their occurrence in gastroenteritis and likely routes of transmission.

After gaining his PhD, Andrew embarked on a number of journeys which saw him gain experiences in both the agricultural, medical and marine sectors, where he developed further capacity in the use of both conventional and new and emerging (omics-based) technologies for addressing pertinent questions in microbial ecology, particularly as it relates to the host.

Some of the most notable work Andrew has undertaken on his journey thus far has included exploring the relevance of the microbiome in fish health and nutrition; documenting the first known occurrence of typically environmental microbial extremophiles (halophilic archaea) in the gut of humans; isolating and formally identifying new bacterial lineages from conditions of disease; and establishing the mechanisms that allow certain bacterial species to become pervasive chronic infections in the host.

Having gained significant experiences in Germany at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI, Braunschweig) and having recently started a young family, Andrew moved back to Australia to take up a position at the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI) Aquatic Sciences centre, where between 2014-2019, he established the SARDI Aquatics Molecular Sciences Laboratory, and brought new capacity for addressing fundamental questions and challenges arising in the marine sciences, particularly in fisheries and aquaculture.

Andrew is inspired as a mentor and supervisor to many students, and enjoys passing on the knowledge gained from his experiences, whether it be showing his PhD student how to conduct microbiome transplants in fish, or taking his little boy and girl beach combing.

Appointments with speaker may be made via andrew.oxley@deakin.edu.au.

For more info visit https://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/people/andrew-oxley.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Conserving mangrove forests and their ecosystem services

SPEAKER: Assoc Prof Dan Friess, Dean’s Chair, Department of Geography, National University of Singapore

DATE: Friday, 6the December 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207 and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Mangroves are often found along coastlines that are experiencing rapid population growth, and thus can provide a range of benefits, or ecosystem services to increasing coastal populations. These range from fisheries to coastal protection to spiritual and heritage values, and their diversity means that their assessment requires an interdisciplinary approach.

This seminar will discuss our experiences of measuring and modelling mangrove ecosystem services, including the role of mangroves in storing ‘blue carbon’ for climate change mitigation. Importantly, different services can accrue at different scales, from the site scale to the global scale, providing challenges to their estimation.

We will also discuss how ecosystem services can potentially incentivize mangrove conservation, through novel Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes and international climate agreements, and the implementation challenges that these strategies face.

BIO.

Dan is an Associate Professor and Dean’s Chair in the Department of Geography, National University of Singapore. His research focuses on human-environment interactions in the tropical coastal zone, particularly mangrove forests.

Dan’s research group studies the assessment of ecosystem services and their use by local communities, changes to ecosystem services due to deforestation and sea-level rise, and policy mechanisms to conserve ecosystem services. This research is conducted throughout Southeast Asia, as well as Madagascar and New Caledonia.

Dan is also a Lead PI for the Natural Capital Singapore project, a large multi-stakeholder project conducting a national-scale ecosystem service assessment for Singapore.

Appointments with speaker may be made via awhitt@deakin.edu.au.

For more info visit https://www.themangrovelab.com/ and http://www.naturalcapital.sg/.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Emerging challenges of aquatic invasive species in the Anthropocene

SPEAKER: Prof Julian Olden, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, College of the Environment, University of Washington

DATE: Friday, 29th November 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Julian’s research program spans multiple levels of biological organization and modes of inquiry to advance the science and practice of conserving freshwater ecosystems. My principal interests include ecohydrology (dams, environmental flows), community ecology (freshwater fishes, amphibians, invertebrates), invasion biology (science and development of management tools), macroecology (testing and advancing the field of biogeography), climate change (impacts and adaptation strategies), and conservation biology (science and implementation at local and regional scales). Although my research program focuses on these major areas, my enthusiasm for research bridges both basic and applied ecology.

A common thread throughout this research is a strong emphasis on the application of quantitative approaches to data analysis, including the development of innovative statistical techniques for exploring complex ecological data.

BIO.

My approach to science has been shaped by numerous experiences with professors, students and collaborators over the years. I pursued my undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto, and it was during this time that my passion for ecological research and freshwater conservation was first sparked; specifically while hauling nets choked with squirming white suckers from central Ontario lakes.

Next, I received my M.Sc. from the University of Toronto (fish community ecology in lakes), my PhD from Colorado State University (conservation of endangered southwestern fishes) and then I was awarded a David H. Smith Conservation Fellowship to conduct postdoctoral research at the University of Wisconsin (aquatic invasive species ecology and management).

Appointments with speaker may be made via natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au.

For more info: https://fish.uw.edu/faculty/julian-olden/.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Avian body size and climate change

SPEAKER: Dr Janet Gardner, Australian Research Council Future Fellow, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra

DATE: Friday, 22nd November 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Changes in animal body size have been hailed as a third universal response to recent climate change, alongside changes in species’ phenology and distributions. Changes in body size have important implications for the thermal tolerances and energetics of species and thus for individual fitness and population dynamics.

Using Australian birds as a model system, we integrate long-term morphometric data sets (from museum collections and generated by citizen science) with climate data and molecular phylogenies to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of trait change and test underlying mechanisms at a continental scale.

In this talk I outline progress in understanding this phenomenon and the implications of our results for identifying species’ sensitivities to climate change.

BIO.

Janet’s research integrates several complementary approaches to investigate the links between environmental variation, individual fitness and demographic change, factors that ultimately determine the abundance and distribution of species.

Janet was awarded a PhD from the ANU in 2003, was appointed as an Associate Lecturer at ANU in 2004, then as a Research Associate in 2006. Since 2008 she has held several Research Associate positions at CSIRO and Monash University. She returned to ANU in 2015 and is currently an ARC Future Fellow in the Research School of Biology

Appointments with speaker may be made via kate.buchanan@deakin.edu.au.

For more info: https://biology.anu.edu.au/people/janet-gardner.

Please note: Janet will be staying in Torquay on Thursday and going out to dinner at Roku Den on Thursday evening. On Friday we will have lunch at Natural 1 12-1pm before the seminar. Janet will have time both before and after her seminar to chat, so please let me know if you would like to have a short chat with the speaker. Please let Natasha know if you would like to attend one of the meals.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Alarm calls, eavesdropping and deception

SPEAKER: Professor Rob Magrath, Professor of Behavioural Ecology, Australian National University, Canberra

DATE: Friday, 15th November 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Many species of birds and mammals eavesdrop on the alarm calls of other species, and so gain information on danger but also expose themselves to the risk of deception. First, I consider how animals recognize the meaning of other species’ alarm calls. Contrary to intuition, alarm calls don’t all sound similar and may not be intrinsically scary. Instead, individuals commonly respond to familiar but not unfamiliar alarms, implying learning.

I describe experiments to test for learned recognition by Australian birds, including through social learning. Second, paying attention to the alarm calls of others means that you are vulnerable to deceptive use of alarm calls by those species. This commonly entails individuals giving false alarm calls and then stealing food dropped by victims that have fled. I describe a different context, in which the tiny brown thornbill deceives the much larger pied currawong during attempted nest predation.

Overall, our findings reveal how learning can help explain the widespread eavesdropping networks in natural communities, and allow the complex web of information and deception.

BIO.

Rob Magrath is a Professor of Behavioural Ecology at the Australian National University. In recent years his group has focussed on studying acoustic communication and eavesdropping in Australian birds.

We’re interested in both the design and function of signals, and have studied communication about danger, parent-offspring communication, vocal mimicry and duetting.

Appointments with speaker may be made via natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au.

For more info: http://biology.anu.edu.au/research/groups/magrath-group-behavioural-ecology-acoustic-communication-ornithology.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: From fruit sizes to genomes: a short history of rainforest diversity in Australia

SPEAKER: Dr Maurizio Rossetto, Senior Principal Research Scientist, Head Evolutionary Ecology (Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney), Honorary Professor, The University of Queensland

DATE: Friday, 8th November 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Our research combines genomic data with a range of other investigative approaches including environmental modelling, functional ecology and more recently indigenous knowledge. Although we study the Australian flora in general, much of our research has focused on rainforest trees, with a particular interest on how temporal environmental change and dispersal affect landscape-level dynamics.

Australian rainforests have a highly dynamic history that enabled them to respond to change through time. Seed dispersal is a key process in plant spatial dynamics impacting on the distribution of species as well as the assembly of communities. Based on this premise we use genomic, environmental and ecological data from rainforest trees to investigate the impact of climatic shifts on rainforest distribution in support of the development of management strategies that consider short- and long-term actions and outcomes

BIO.

Most of Maurizio’s research projects revolve around a broad vision: to investigate the factors impacting on the spatio-temporal distribution and assembly of native plant species. The vision can be summarised within two simple concepts: 1) describing and interpreting patterns of organismal diversity (measuring biodiversity); 2) describing and interpreting the fit of organisms to their environment (measuring adaptation).

To achieve this Maurizio’s lab combines genetic and genomic data, with a range of other investigative approaches including environmental modelling, functional ecology and more recently indigenous knowledge. Although he is interested in the Australian flora in general, much of his research has been on rainforest trees, with a particular focus on investigating how temporal changes and dispersal potential affect landscape-level dynamics.

Appointments with speaker may be made via m.richardson@deakin.edu.au.

For more info: https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/science/our-science-staff/dr-maurizio-rossetto.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Using biophysical models in marine management planning

SPEAKERS: Dr Kay Chritchell, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Marine Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University

DATE: Friday, 1st November 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room ka4.207

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Physical processes help to shape the distribution of every population on the planet. In the marine environment, many species are at the mercy of the currents for their dispersal and subsequent survival. This dispersal between connected sub-populations drives resilience and recovery, and understanding the dispersal pathways allows managers to make informed decisions.

In this talk I will discuss my PhD work on dispersal pathways of plastic pollution in the Whitsunday Islands, and my subsequent collaborative work applying those principles and skills to organisms in various sea-scapes (such as Sulawesi, Palau, and the Great Barrier Reef). I will discuss what this dispersal means for their populations, and our management actions.

BIO.

Kay is a post-doc in the Marine Spatial Ecology and Conservation Lab, lead by Eric A. Treml. She was awarded a PhD from James Cook University in 2018.

Her research focuses on the physical processes that influence the distributions of organisms and pollutants, in time and space. Kay’s PhD thesis explored and quantified the processes that effect the movement and accumulation of plastic pollution, including microplastics, in the coastal zone.

Kay has since worked on projects exploring larval dispersal, and the impact of management decisions in the marine environment. Kay’s current work is focused on larval transport and conservation priorities for fisheries management.

Appointments with speaker may be made via kay.critchell@deakin.edu.au .

For more info: you can find a list of Kay’s publications on ORCID, and she tweets about her research from her Twitter Account.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Genetic and epigenetic drivers of invasion

SPEAKERS: Assoc Prof Lee Ann Rollins, UNSW Scientia Fellow, Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of NSW, Sydney

DATE: Friday, 25th October 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

Exotic invasions offer an ideal opportunity to investigate evolution, which often occurs rapidly when organisms are introduced to novel environments. Although ecological correlates of invasion success are well-studied, our knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms is poor.

In this talk, I will present recent findings from our research group regarding the roles of genetic and epigenetic change in two highly successful invaders, cane toads and starlings. I will also discuss potential roles for microbiomes and parasites to influence invasion success in their hosts, and our work to investigate these possibilities. In combination, our research indicates that the genetics and epigenetics of invasive populations are likely to be key drivers of invasion success.

BIO.

Lee Rollins is a Scientia Fellow in Evolution & Ecology Research Centre and the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science at UNSW Sydney. She was awarded a PhD from UNSW in Conservation Genetics in 2009 and was awarded fellowships from Deakin University (2012) and from the Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher scheme (2015).

Her research investigates genetic and epigenetic drivers of evolution during exotic species invasion using species like cane toads and starlings. She is keen to understand how environmental factors affect genome function across generations, a topic that likely impacts all organisms on our planet.

Appointments with speaker may be made via kate.buchanan@deakin.edu.au.

For more info: http://www.eerc.unsw.edu.au/lee-ann-rollins.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: Sexual selection before and after mating

SPEAKERS: Professor Leigh Simmons, Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Western Australia, WA

DATE: Friday, 18th October 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room)

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

ABSTRACT.

What to do when you cannot have it all? A fundamental tenant of life history theory is the notion than animals have a limited supply of resources that must be allocated to different activities to maximize fitness. Males must decide how much they invest in competing for females (the weapons and ornaments of pre-mating sexual selection) and how much they must invest in their fertility (ejaculates used in post-mating sexual competition).

In this overview of his work, Leigh will give a general introduction to pre- and post-mating sexual selection, before briefly outlining some theoretical models used to predict the evolution of male sexual traits in the face of competing demands. He will then present some empirical studies that have sought to test these predictions. In so doing he will be focussing on research on three model systems, dung beetles, frogs and field crickets, and on a series of comparative analyses.

BIO.

Leigh Simmons is Professor of Evolutionary Biology at the University of Western Australia. He studied at the University of Nottingham where he received his PhD in 1986. He held a research fellowship at the University of Liverpool UK before moving to Australia in 1995.

He has published more than 350 articles and 5 books on the behavior and ecology of reproduction in an array of taxa from insects to humans. He is Editor-in Chief of Behavioral Ecology and Editor of Advances in the Study of Behavior. He is a recipient of the Zoological Society of London’s Scientific Medal, held an Australian Research Council Federation Fellowship from 2005-2009, and was elected to the Australian Academy in 2009.

Appointments with speaker may be made via natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au.

For more info: https://research-repository.uwa.edu.au/en/persons/leigh-simmons.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

CIE Seminar Series – 2019: joint seminar, presented by Dr Kate Watermeyer (Modelling, what is it good for? Supporting ecosystem-based conservation) and Dr Chloe Sato (Life as an ECR: alpine reptiles, agri-environment schemes, biodiversity indicators and ecosystem collapse)

SPEAKERS: Dr Kate Watermeyer & Dr Chloe Sato, Postdoctoral Research Fellows, The Conservation Science Research Group, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Environmental Sciences, Deakin University

DATE: Friday, 4th October 2019

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

Seminar will also be video linked to the following campuses: Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – Room ka4.207 (Green room) and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (Fishbowl)

DR KATE WATERMEYER: Modelling, what is it good for? Supporting ecosystem-based conservation.

ABSTRACT.

An ecosystem-based approach to conservation and management offers great potential to address large-scale threats and interactions missed by a more traditional species-focused approach, but it’s not without its challenges. Models can go a long way towards tackling some of these difficulties, from understanding system dynamics, to testing the indicators used to monitor states and trends and inform management decisions.

In this talk I’ll briefly discuss some of the approaches I’ve been involved in over my PhD and time as a postdoc, here at Deakin and elsewhere, working on marine and terrestrial ecosystem change and biodiversity indicators.

BIO.

Kate is a Research Fellow in Emily Nicholson’s Conservation Science group at Deakin (Burwood), working together on developing and testing biodiversity indicators for conservation and monitoring.

She is an ecologist with a background in marine biology, oceanography and atmosphere science, previously based at the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Cape Town, and in the Global Change Biology Group at Stellenbosch University, both South Africa.

Her research interests include biodiversity indicators, ecosystem modelling, and drivers of system-level change.

DR CHLOE SATO: Life as an ECR: alpine reptiles, agri-environment schemes, biodiversity indicators and ecosystem collapse.

ABSTRACT.

This isn’t your ‘traditional’ research talk… Dr Chloe Sato is going to fly through her 5-year history as an ECR both within and outside academia.

It’s been a wild ride of experimental manipulations to understand alpine reptile ecology, assessing agri-environment scheme effectiveness, investigating theoretical and practical applications of biodiversity indicators, exploring ecosystem collapse and risk assessments, and finding ways to use this knowledge in government.

By the end of this talk, Chloe is hoping you know her a little better, what she’s doing now, her broad research motivations, and that it encourages discussions to shape her research over the next three years.

BIO.

Dr Chloe Sato has recently joined the lab of Associate Professor Emily Nicholson and is exploring ecosystem risk assessments in alpine systems under changing climate regimes. She has previously worked for ACT Government and NSW Government as part of the Environmental Offsets Team and Saving Our Species Team respectively.

Before her time in government, she was a Research Fellow at the Australian National University with Professor David Lindenmayer and conducted research in the areas of biodiversity surrogates, ecosystem collapse and assessing the effectiveness of agri-environment schemes in temperate woodlands.

Appointments with speaker may be made via Chloe Sato (c.sato@deakin.edu.au) or Kate Watermeyer (kate.watermeyer@deakin.edu.au).

For more info: https://conservationscience.org.au/#post-564.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!