CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Hibernation in primates: Why lemurs in hot Madagascar hibernate?

SPEAKER: Professor Kathrin Dausmann, Head of Research Unit – Functional Ecology, Institute of Zoology, University of Hamburg, Germany

DATE & TIME: Friday, 19th June 2020 @ 12:00 noon

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Of all fundamental principles in biology, energy expenditure is perhaps the single-most important as it is a prerequisite for life itself. In many species life history parameters, such as nutrition ecology, reproductive patterns or even social systems are shaped by energetical constraints. To cope with environmental energetic bottlenecks many small mammal species use torpor or hibernation.

Over the last decades it has become evident that not only the “classical” hibernators of temperate and arctic regions use this option, but also animal groups much less expected. One example are the lemurs of Madagascar, all living under tropical, but nevertheless seasonal and energetically demanding conditions.

Comparison of the Cheirogaleidae species showed that there is an amazing physiological flexibility in regard to their thermoregulatory adaptations, depending on the climatic parameters of their habitat and choices of hibernacula, between closely related species, between individuals of the same population, or even within the same individual, reflecting ecological and evolutionary forces.

The insight into tropical species has also taught us that the underlying ecological causes which elicit the employment of heterothermy are not restricted to seasonal adjustments. This flexibility may possibly prove beneficial in heterothermic species to master the challenges of current and future climate changes.


BIO.

Kathrin decided at a young age on a family trip to Greece that she wanted to become an ant researcher, which she thought was much more fascinating than looking at any more ancient rubble. However, something went wrong somewhere along the line and she became intrigued with energetics and how animals are able to make a living on the edge and adapt to all kinds of environmental changes.

Kathrin is now a professor for Functional Ecology, focusing on ecology and energy budgets in a changing world mostly in small mammals, but also frogs, lizards and birds (not ants, so far). An almost accidental trip to Madagascar sparked her fascination for this country and she has spent a lot of time in tents and hammocks in the forests of Madagascar, chasing down friendly lemurs.

Kathrin still looks at every ant she sees and continues to be fascinated by them.

For more info click HERE.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Rethinking the management of invertebrates and their services in cities

SPEAKER: Dr Lizzy Lowe, Postdoctoral Researcher, Behavioural Ecology Lab, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW

DATE & TIME: Friday, 12th June 2020 @ 12:00 noon

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect.


ABSTRACT.

The declines in insect populations being observed around the world are alarming, given the vital ecosystem services the invertebrates provide. The loss of insect diversity in many areas is largely driven by the use of insecticides, especially in cities where chemical pest control is mostly unregulated and can even exceed amounts used in agriculture.

This excessive use of insecticides threatens public health, biodiversity and ecosystem function. Integrated pest management (IPM) is a toolkit of pest control strategies which has been developed for agricultural systems to reduce reliance on chemical control. It is possible to use IPM in urban areas but stakeholders (e.g. urban residents, businesses and pest control professionals) have been slow to change their practices.

The aim of my work is to understand the impact of urban insecticide use on biodiversity and insect mediated ecosystem services, and to shift urban pest control towards more sustainable practice. This involves identifying extensive knowledge gaps in the extent of pesticide use in cities and improving stakeholder engagement by understanding people’s values and offering alternative pest control solutions.


BIO.

Dr Lizzy Lowe is a Postdoctoral researcher in the Behavioural Ecology group at Macquarie University. Lizzy completed her PhD at the University of Sydney in 2016 and was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Auckland in 2017.

As an urban ecologist Lizzy is passionate about working with local communities to improve engagement with nature in cities. She has a particular passion for raising the public profile of underappreciated animals such as spiders, and you’ll often find her out leading ‘spider walks’ for community groups or chatting on radio about why we should love ‘creepy crawlies’.

For more info click HERE or @LizyLowe.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Feeling the heat – avian responses to changing climates

SPEAKER: Dr Todd McWhorter, Senior Lecturer in Veterinary Physiology, School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, SA

DATE & TIME: Friday, 5th June 2020 @ 12:00 noon

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Wild birds are vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events such as heatwaves. Mass die-offs of birds due to heatwaves have been reported, both historic and recent, in Australia and worldwide. The frequency and intensity of heatwaves, and average maximum air temperatures, are expected to continue increasing over coming decades, thus increasing the likelihood of wild bird die-offs.

These events have the potential to impact bird populations, species distributions and biodiversity, i.e. where birds are able to live and the contributions they make to ecosystems. Especially concerning are the potential impacts on threatened or endangered species, where a few extreme weather events can significantly reduce remaining populations.

Recent work on body temperature regulation across a number of bird orders inhabiting deserts in North America, Australia and Africa has revealed differences in heat tolerance and the mechanisms used to defend body temperature under hot conditions.

In this talk, I will explore data collected by our group on heat tolerance and evaporative water loss, using a taxonomic perspective. I will also discuss two studies done by my recent Ph.D. student Shangzhe Xie (now at Wildlife Reserves Singapore) on behavioural responses of birds to heat, and physiological stress responses to heat exposure.

We don’t know enough about the physiological and behavioural responses of birds to heat exposure to make good predictions about species’ vulnerability to climate change – such data will be important for improved conservation outcomes.


BIO.

I am a comparative/ecological/evolutionary physiologist interested in how animals function and how function evolves. Over the past 25 years my research has focused primarily on the mechanisms of digestion and nutrient absorption, modelling digestive capacity, nutritional ecology, kidney function, and salt and water balance.

More recently, my research program has expanded into conservation physiology and medicine- applying the concepts and methodologies of these fields to pressing problems in conservation of wildlife and biodiversity in general.

Current projects in this area include assessing the impacts of climate change and extreme weather events on the physiological and stress responses of animals, studying the impacts of habitat fragmentation and other anthropogenic disturbances on the physiological responses of animals, and developing novel methods to control feral animals.

I am originally from southern California and did my undergraduate study at the University of California, Irvine. After earning a M.Sc. from the University of Wyoming and Ph.D. from the University of Arizona it was my pleasure to spend a few years as a postdoc in Bill Karasov’s lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

A successful ARC-DP application on the nutritional ecology and physiology of nectar-feeding birds brought me to Trish Fleming’s lab in the veterinary school at Murdoch University in March 2006.

An opportunity to help found the new veterinary School at the University of Adelaide brought my family and me to Adelaide in early 2009.

For more info click HERE.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Sea turtle research in the Chagos Archipelago marine protected area

SPEAKER: Dr Jacques-Olivier Laloë, Associate Research Fellow, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University

DATE & TIME: Friday, 29th May 2020 @ 12:00 noon

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect.


ABSTRACT.

The Chagos Archipelago lies in the middle of one of the largest marine protected areas (MPA) in the world and has a rich diversity of marine life including sea turtles. Deakin University has collaborated with other universities and carried out research in the Chagos Archipelago MPA since 2012.

Here I will present some of our research at this unique site, including the surveying of beaches for turtle nesting activities, the long-term monitoring of sand temperatures to track climate warming, the tracking of adult and juvenile turtles with satellite tags, and drone surveys of key foraging habitats.

Our work improves our understanding of the biology and ecology of both hawksbill and green sea turtles that use the Indian Ocean during parts of their life histories and helps drive national and international conservation policies for sea turtles in general.


BIO.

Jacques-Olivier Laloë is a post-doctoral researcher at Deakin University, Australia. His main research interests are sea turtle ecology, biotelemetry, climate change and conservation.

He has worked with sea turtles since 2007 and his main study sites include the Cape Verde Islands, French Polynesia, and the Chagos Archipelago.

For more info click HERE or visit Jacques-Olivier’s website.

Zoom appointments with speaker may be made via jacquesolivier.laloe@deakin.edu.au.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Footprints and Transformations

SPEAKER: Professor Thomas (Tommy) Wiedmann, Leader, Sustainability Assessment Program, University of NSW, Sydney

DATE & TIME: Friday, 22nd May 2020 @ 12noon

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect.

Due to previous technical problems, whereby Prof Thomas Wiedmann was unable to present his seminar to the end, Thomas has kindly agreed to deliver his seminar once again. We hope you are all able to sit back and tune into Thomas’ seminar on Friday.


ABSTRACT.

Consumption-based accounting or ‘footprint assessment’ provides a unique perspective of environmental and social consequences of consuming goods and services. It reveals indirect, hidden or distant impacts that are often not linked to consumption activities and enables new ways of assigning responsibilities.

This presentation summarises the last seven years of research in the Sustainability Assessment Program at UNSW Sydney. It provides examples of how footprint assessments based on environmental input-output analysis have been applied to assess the sustainability performance of nations, cities, sectors, technologies and materials.

The presentation also maps out how this research links to integrated assessment and scenario modelling of national performance regarding the Sustainable Development Goals and Planetary Boundaries. More quantitative research is required to inform decisions on policies and investments that deliver the transformational change needed for prosperous, fairer and more environmentally sustainable societies.


BIO.

Thomas (Tommy) Wiedmann is Professor of sustainability research and is leading the Sustainability Assessment Program at UNSW Sydney, Australia. In teaching and research, he is guided by the question on how to achieve concurrent human and planetary well-being.

Tommy has long-standing expertise is in integrated, quantitative sustainability assessment, industrial ecology and environmental footprint analysis. He is leading the development and application of the Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab), a collaborative research platform for environmentally extended multi-region input-output analysis.

Tommy has coordinated a number of sustainability-related research projects funded by European and Australian Governments worth about $6m in total. His recent research is focusing on urban sustainability and sustainability transformations.

In 2012, Tommy received the Thomson Reuters Citation Award in Australia and he has been listed as Highly Cited Researcher annually since 2015.

For more info http://www.wrc.unsw.edu.au/staff/tommy-wiedmann.

Video appointments with speaker may be made via b.bryan@deakin.edu.au.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Resources, stress and fitness: how energy availability can mask trade-offs between survival and reproduction functions of mountain bluebird feathers

SPEAKER: Prof Creagh Breuner, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana (Organismal Biology, Ecology and Evolution, and The Wildlife Biology Program)

DATE & TIME: Friday, 1st May 2020 @ 12:00 noon

LOCATION: Seminar to be streamed via Zoom. Click HERE to connect.


ABSTRACT.

Stress hormones are thought to benefit animals by redirecting energy from non-essential functions (reproduction) towards survival.

However, three separate hypotheses predict very different outcomes for glucocorticoid (stress hormone) effects on fitness. Field data testing between hypotheses has exploded over the last 11 years, but no clear concensus has emerged.

I propose the discrepancy in results may be due to variation in resource availability. In free-living animals, trade-offs between survival and reproduction may be masked by high resource availability in good years, but evident in poor years.

Current literature testing between these hypotheses rarely incorporates metrics of resource availability. In 1986 Van Noordwijk and de Jong proposed the acquisition/allocation model to explain positive vs. negative correlations between reproduction and survival across individuals. Their mode identifies resources as critical to evaluating individual allocation strategies (favoring reproduction vs survival), and therefore provides the ideal model for testing across the three hypotheses.

In this talk I will:

  1. Review the three hypotheses in light of the last 11 years of data;
  2. Review the relatively small subset of fitness/glucocorticoid papers that incorporate a resource perspective;
  3. Introduce the Van Noordwijk and de Jong framework as a model for fitness/glucocorticoid hypothesis testing, and;
  4. Discuss recent results testing the effects of resource limitation on tradeoffs between feather structure and color in mountain bluebirds (Sialia currucoides).

BIO.

Creagh Breuner is a professor in both Ecology/Evolution and The Wildlife Biology programs at the University of Montana.

She has studied behavioral endocrinology within mechanistic, evolutionary, and conservation frameworks over the past 25 years, and now splits her time between research and heading the large UM Biology Division as Associate Dean.

For more info visit The Breuner Lab.

Video appointments with speaker may be made via creagh.breuner@mso.umt.edu.


As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone.

Thanking you in advance!

Call for external seminar speakers via live streaming

An expression of interest is open to our external followers to present a talk via live-streaming to the Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University.

If interested, please do provide us (natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au) with your details below:

  • your name
  • email/website address
  • your research areas
  • your research topic that you wish to speak about
  • any date preferences

Your talk must align with our Centre’s research areas which can be viewed @ cie-deakin.com.

Upon receiving your interest, a check will be conducted prior to offering you a seminar talk slot.

We look forward to hearing from all you researchers out there: including behavioural ecologists, wildlife and evolutionary biologists, geneticists, environmental scientists, and experts in economics, sustainability, bioinformatics and biodiversity conservation, working across terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments.

As the University is using Zoom as the preferred tool for connecting to our seminars.

Instructions will provided if there is a talk booked.

Stay safe and healthy! Thanking you all in advance.

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: A crash course in Disease Ecology with special reference to COVID-19

SPEAKER: Alfred Deakin Professor Marcel Klaassen, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong

DATE: Friday, 27th March 2020

TIME: 1:30pm-2:30pm

LOCATION: Seminar was live streamed and one can view the recording HERE


ABSTRACT.

Using excerpts from my SLE354 unit “Disease Ecology and Epidemiology” and the most recent information on COVID19 from the primary literature, I will address the following questions:

  • Where does COVID-19 come from?
  • Will it become more virulent over time?
  • What are the transmission characteristics?
  • How to manage it?
  • Can we avoid pandemics from happening again?

Without promising definitive answers, I hope this seminar will provide more scientific context and possibly reassurance to what is currently dramatically impacting our lives.


BIO.

Alfred Deakin Prof. Marcel Klaassen has developed broad research interests including theoretical, experimental and observational studies on numerous animal, plant and microbe taxa.

Throughout this, his focus has primarily been on topics in bird migration, nutritional ecology and disease ecology.

For more info visit https://cie-deakin.com/marcel-klaassen/.

CIE Seminar Series – 2020: Footprints and Transformations

SPEAKER: Professor Thomas (Tommy) Wiedmann, Leader, Sustainability Assessment Program, University of NSW, Sydney

DATE: Friday, 20th March 2020

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION: Seminar will be delivered electronically
External parties may connect to the live seminar via 52236991@deakin.edu.au [ID.36991] or via a web browser (WebRTC) https://deakin.service-now.com/kb_view_customer.do?sysparm_article=KB0013965

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!


ABSTRACT.

Consumption-based accounting or ‘footprint assessment’ provides a unique perspective of environmental and social consequences of consuming goods and services. It reveals indirect, hidden or distant impacts that are often not linked to consumption activities and enables new ways of assigning responsibilities.

This presentation summarises the last seven years of research in the Sustainability Assessment Program at UNSW Sydney. It provides examples of how footprint assessments based on environmental input-output analysis have been applied to assess the sustainability performance of nations, cities, sectors, technologies and materials.

The presentation also maps out how this research links to integrated assessment and scenario modelling of national performance regarding the Sustainable Development Goals and Planetary Boundaries.

More quantitative research is required to inform decisions on policies and investments that deliver the transformational change needed for prosperous, fairer and more environmentally sustainable societies.


BIO.

Thomas (Tommy) Wiedmann is Professor of sustainability research and is leading the Sustainability Assessment Program at UNSW Sydney, Australia. In teaching and research, he is guided by the question on how to achieve concurrent human and planetary well-being. Tommy has long-standing expertise is in integrated, quantitative sustainability assessment, industrial ecology and environmental footprint analysis.

He is leading the development and application of the Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab), a collaborative research platform for environmentally extended multi-region input-output analysis. Tommy has coordinated a number of sustainability-related research projects funded by European and Australian Governments worth about $6m in total.

His recent research is focusing on urban sustainability and sustainability transformations. In 2012, Tommy received the Thomson Reuters Citation Award in Australia and he has been listed as Highly Cited Researcher annually since 2015.

Appointments with speaker may be made via b.bryan@deakin.edu.au.

For more info visit http://www.wrc.unsw.edu.au/staff/tommy-wiedmann.


External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?

External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

  • For external guests, you can connect as a web guest by clicking HERE. If using Chrome you it will prompt you to install the Cisco Jaba Plugin, then it will prompt you to download the extension which you will need to install. Once this has been installed, you will have a black screen with a call button. You will just need to click call and it should connect into the VMP.
  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
  • Could not log in? More info on how to connect is available HERE or HERE.
  • From a mobile phone or landline: call +613 92517000, wait for the prompt, then enter the five digit VMP number (36958)
  • Please note that connection is only available while a seminar is taking place.

As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!