CIE Seminar Series 2018: Conservation of coastal and freshwater ecosystems: making the case for better management and rehabilitation

SPEAKER: Dr Paul CarnellResearch Fellow, Blue Carbon Lab, Conservation Science Lab & Marine Mapping Group, Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Queenscliff

DATE: Friday, 22nd June 2018

TIME: 1:30pm

LOCATION:Melbourne Campus at Burwood –Burwood Corporate Centre

Geelong Campus at Waurn Ponds – room KA4.207 (green room); and Warrnambool Campus, Room J2.19 (fishbowl)

External visitors – wish to join us and connect to our seminars?
External parties may connect to the live seminar via *N SEBE VMP LES Seminars 52236958@deakin.edu.au [ID.36958] via the methods listed below:

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  • For Deakin staff and students, please join via Skype for Business (Lync) – if you have office installed you may already have Skype for business or Lync installed. You just need to look for it on the start menu. If you find it, you can log into skype using your Deakin email and password and then dial 36958.
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As a courtesy, we request that when connecting to the seminar that you mute your microphone unless you are required to speak, this would ensure that the sound from the speaker to the audience is not disrupted by feedback from your microphone – thank you!

ABSTRACT.  Despite the best of efforts of scientists and conservationists, there is still a global biodiversity crisis. Development projects which impact the environment are approved because the contribution to the economy is placed front and centre. While the services of ecosystems is generally recognised, rarely are they valued on a local scale and included into decision making. The goal of research on ecosystem function and services is to support the case for biodiversity and ecosystem conservation. By measuring and valuing the services of ecosystems, we can place their value into the broader social-economic context. In this talk I will highlight some of the work I/we have been undertaking as part of the Blue Carbon Lab and the Mapping Ocean Wealth project to further coastal and freshwater ecosystem management and rehabilitation.

BIO. Paul graduated from the University of Melbourne in 2008, with a Bachelor of Science (Honours). He worked with Prof. Mick Keough for 2 years, before then undertaking his PhD investigating the drivers of change on kelp dominated reefs in Victoria. After finishing, Paul joined the Blue Carbon Lab with Peter Macreadie in 2014, while also working at Parks Victoria in their Science and Management Effectiveness branch. As the Blue Carbon Lab continued to grow, Paul started full-time in the lab in 2015. As of April 2018, Paul will be shifting location to be based at the Queenscliff marine research station.

For more info: http://www.bluecarbonlab.org/lab-members/dr-paul-carnell/

Appointments with guest speaker may be made via natasha.kaukov@deakin.edu.au

ARC Linkage success for the Centre for Integrative Ecology

We are thrilled to announce that members of the Centre for Integrative Ecology have been successful in the latest round of Linkage Projects announced by the Australia Research Council.

Image result for australian research council

Planning for sustainable development and biodiversity on Indigenous Lands
This project will be led by the CIE’s Dr Emily Nicholson and aims to develop a new approach to participatory land-use planning for sustainable development and conservation, in partnership with the Tiwi Land Council. Planning for sustainable development is complex but vital to reconciling economic, social and conservation goals worldwide. The project will evaluate land-use scenarios, including Indigenous Protected Areas, with ecological and economic models that integrate Indigenous and scientific knowledge. Benefits will include new planning tools and improved understanding of trade-offs between goals, especially on Australia’s Indigenous estates.
Award amount: $490,233
Partners: Tiwi Land Council.
Co-investigators:  Ms Kate Hadden; Dr Brett Murphy; Dr Margaret Ayre; Associate Professor Jane Elith; Dr Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita; Dr Alan Andersen; Professor Brett Bryan; Professor Tom Kompas.

CIE participation in projects led by other institutions
Integrating fire and predator management to conserve threatened species: led by Professor Brendan Wintle at University of Melbourne and including CIE director Professor Don Driscoll. $439,000

Ecosystem risk assessment: led by Professor David Keith at UNSW and including Dr Emily Nicholson, Associate Professor Rebecca Lester, Dr Susanna Venn and Dr Lucie Bland. $416,000

Natural selection and the Tasmanian devil: led by Dr Rodrigo Hamede at University of Tasmania and including Dr Beata Ujvari. $300,000

Nutritional requirements of the critically endangered corroboree frog: led by Dr Phillip Byrne at University of Woolongong and including Professor John Endler. $334,000

Congratulations to everyone involved in these projects, along with all other successful applicants this round!

CIE Spotlight: The genetic structure of the introduced house sparrow populations in Australia and New Zealand is consistent with historical descriptions of multiple introductions to each country

The genetic structure of the introduced house sparrow populations in Australia and New Zealand is consistent with historical descriptions of multiple introductions to each country.
See the paper at Biological Invasions.

CIE Spotlight: Genetic diversity through time and space: diversity and demographic history from natural history specimens and serially sampled contemporary populations of the threatened Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae)

Genetic diversity through time and space: diversity and demographic history from natural history specimens and serially sampled contemporary populations of the threatened Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae).
See the paper at Conservation Genetics.