Media

“Dingo advocate Ernest Healy joins Victorian wild-dog committee“. 13 June 2017 by James Wagstaff: A key dingo protection advocate has been appointed to the Victorian Government’s wild dog management advisory committee. The committee will also include Deakin University applied ecology and conservation researcher Euan Ritchie..………………..
The Weekly Times: Committee to advise the Government on management of wild dogs

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“Brumbies cull: Battle over wild horses in Kosciusko National Park heats up“. 11 June 2017 by Peter Hannam: In a letter last week to the Premier Gladys Berejiklian, the Ecological Society of Australia’s president and CIE’s director Don Driscoll said horse numbers may already be underestimated and “the problem gets worse the longer a decision to rapidly reduce horse numbers is delayed”..………………..
The Sydney Morning Herald: The government is set to reject key measures outlined in its draft management plan

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“Bridging the divide“. 7 June 2017 by Deakin Research: Climate change. Habitat and biodiversity loss. Food and water security. The burden of disease.
According to the recently established Deakin University Science and Society Network (SSN), these global challenges are interconnected. Solving them will require the breaking down of traditional barriers between social sciences and humanities and life, environmental and materials science.………………..
Deakin Research: Could increased collaboration between scientific disciplines help overcome immense challenges facing the world?

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“Dingoes to the rescue?“. 24 May 2017 by Deakin Research: Dingoes are a polarising force in Australian society, viewed as both victim and villain. The introduced red fox, however, has few friends among native animals or farmers. Now, the first study to look at the effects of dingo distribution and abundance on fox populations has found that fox numbers are reduced in areas where dingo numbers are high.
The article, “Top predators constrain mesopredator distributions” (Lead researcher Dr Thomas Newsome), published in “Nature Communications” today examines the relationship between foxes and dingoes as part of a wider study investigating the effects of apex predators on smaller mesopredators.………………..
Deakin Research: Could dingoes be the answer to controlling the havoc red foxes wreak on native and domestic animal populations?

More information can be found on:

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“When wolves return to the wild everything changes“. 17 May 2017 by Yao-Hua Law: Scientists had intended to reintroduce and conserve grey wolves in their original habitats. They did not foresee that the wolves, with blood on their teeth and claws, would restore leaves to the trees.………………..
BBC – Earth: Top predators like wolves have a powerful effect on their ecosystems

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“Why do some graziers want to retain, not kill, dingoes?“. 15 May 2017 by Euan Ritchie: A growing body of research argues that dingoes can be effective at controlling kangaroo and feral goat populations, especially on cattle stations.………………..
The Conversation: Putting dingoes to work

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“The bark side: domestic dogs threaten endangered species worldwide“. 2 May 2017 by Tim Doherty, Aaron J. Wirsing, Chris Dickman, Dale Nimmo, Euan Ritchie and Thomas Newsome: There are now an estimated 1 billion domestic dogs across their near-global distribution. Our latest research reveals that the ecological “pawprint” of domestic dogs is much greater than previously realised………………..
The Conversation: Dogs are third-most-damaging mammal

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“Nature is neglected in this election campaign – at its and our own peril“. 19 April 2017 by Don Driscoll and Euan RitchieThe electioneering has begun. In a campaign set to be dominated by economic issues, the Coalition and Labor are locking horns over who can best manage our finances, protect jobs and make housing more affordable. The Greens predictably decry the major parties, including their cavalier climate-change policies.
These are important issues, but are they highest priority on the political agenda? An arguably even greater issue exists that nobody is seriously championing, but which impacts all of us, socially, environmentally and economically………………..
The Conversation: Our natural heritage – the plants, animals and other organisms that help define Australia’s identity – are in dire straits

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“A world-first book combining evolutionary ecology and oncology aims to improve cancer prevention and therapies“. 7 April 2017 by Deakin Research: “The Ecology and Evolution of Cancer”, co-edited by Dr Beata Ujvari, is the first in the relatively new field of evolutionary medicine, which encompasses the disciplines of ecology, oncology and biology and takes an evolutionary and ecology approach to treating cancer……………….
Deakin Research: first-of-its-kind publication in an exciting new scientific field

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“A new paper examines how the reliance of large predators on human-provided food impacts on ecosystems, human-wildlife interactions and the genetic diversity of predator populations“. 6 April 2017 by Deakin Research: Around the world, large predators, such as grey wolves and bears, are reoccupying their former habitats. However, in their absence, the environment has often been modified by humans and contains an abundant supply of human – or anthropogenic – foods like garbage, livestock and carcasses left by hunters……………….
Deakin Research: Are we re-domesticating the wolf?

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“Government needs to front up billions, not millions, to save Australia’s threatened species“. 21 March 2017 by Don Driscoll, Bek Christensen & Euan RitchieThe government has proposed 51 projects, costing from A$45,000 to A$6 million. At first glance the prospectus is a positive initiative. But it also highlights that the current government is unwilling to invest what’s needed to assure the conservation of our threatened plants, animals and other organisms……………….
The Conversation: business and philanthropic support in partnership with the government and community groups to raise around A$14 million each year

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“Tidal marshes exposed as massive carbon sinks“. 14 March 2017 by Deakin Research: For the first time, a dollar figure has been placed on the carbon storage (sequestration) value of Australia’s tidal marshes. Ecologist Dr Peter Macreadie, from Deakin University’s Centre for Integrative Ecology (CIE) and Director of Blue Carbon Lab, led an international team of scientists on the project, with samples being collected from marshes around Australia. Their research findings were recently published in “Nature Scientific Reports,” with Blue Carbon Lab’s Mr Quinn Ollivier, a PhD student, a joint author……………….
Deakin Research: Australian tidal marshes have been found to contribute $37M annually in organic carbon storage

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“Women ecologists provide strength in numbers“. 8 March 2017:
Encouraging girls into science is a tough ask, but one that surely benefits from role models. Nationally and internationally there is a recognition of the lack of representation of women in scientific jobs. However, it’s clear that the Centre for Integrative Ecology (CIE) is bucking that trend – with excellent female representation in traditional STEM subject areas……………….
Deakin Women: The number of early and mid-career women researchers in Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology (CIE) has reached a critical mass

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“Ecology and Evolution of Cancer“. 3 March 2017, An interview by Red Symons:
The book Ecology and Evolution of Cancer (edited by Beata Ujvari, Benjamin Roche and Frederic Thomas) outlining an exceptional new approach of this terrible disease as an evolutionary and ecological process.
According to Dr Ujvari the book was the first to look at using an evolutionary ecology approach with the aim of improving cancer prevention and therapies……………….
ABC Radio Melbourne – Breakfast (scroll to 45min,10s)

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“Want clean water? Plant a lot of seagrass“. 17 February 2017 By Jana Howden:
Carolyn Ewers Lewis, a marine and coastal ecologist from Deakin University’s CIE, notes the significance of the discovery: “Seagrasses fringe nearly every continent on Earth, so finding that they again have another benefit is one more reason we need to pay attention to how we’re conserving them”………………
COSMOS Magazine: Seagrass is much more than a sediment stabiliser

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“Beware the sly fox“. 13 February 2017 By Wendy Harmer:
CIE researcher Euan Ritchie, talking with Wendy Harmer from ABC Sydney, about foxes climbing trees………………
ABC Sydney Mornings: Foxes seen climbing trees at night to track down and eat koalas

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“Scientists hope wetland carbon storage experiment is everyone’s cup of tea“. 2 February 2017 By Melissa Davey:
Deakin University researcher Peter Macreadie and PhD candidate Katy Limpert are part of a project aiming to bury tens of thousands of teabags in wetlands around the world. They are hoping others will sacrifice a few cups of tea and join in to discover how efficient different wetlands are at capturing and storing carbon dioxide………………
The Guardian: Citizen scientists are being sought for a project which will see tens of thousands of teabags buried in wetlands to monitor carbon sequestration

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“Choose roo this Australia Day – it’s good for the environment and you“. 24 January 2017 By Elise Snashall-Woodhams:
Lamb is spruiked as the multicultural meat but ecologist Dr Euan Ritchie, from Deakin’s School of Life and Environmental Sciences, suggested if we cared about our homeland it made more sense to eat kangaroo and less of other meats………………
Deakin Media: Two Deakin University researchers are encouraging meat-eaters to consider a native alternative, which offers both environmental and health benefits

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“The world’s best wildlife photography reveals a fragile, beautiful realm“. 19 January 2017 By Mathew Berg and Jessica Williams:
From a leopard slipping through a Mumbai alleyway to giant cuttlefish courting under the sea, the striking images featured in the current Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition are at once beautiful, technically astounding and, often, incredibly moving………………
The Conversation: Wildlife photography giving new life to animals as symbols and storytellers for the natural world

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“How making peace with predators could transform our world“. 20 December 2016 By SoundCloud:
Why are some feral animals running rampant? Should we reintroduce dingoes and Tasmanian devils to parts of Australia? Why doesn’t shark culling work? How can predators help us to fight climate change?………………
SoundCloud.com: Euan Ritchie provides all the answers

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“Researchers optimistic after megafauna dig“. 8 December 2016 By Deakin Invenio:
Having captured the popular imagination, Australian megafauna such as giant kangaroos, wombats and marsupial lions, which once wandered Australia’s plains and forests, are equally intriguing to scientists. These giant marsupials raise questions as to how they lived, where they roamed and why they became extinct………………
Deakin Invenio: The ‘buckets of bones’ discovered at Lancefield, north of Melbourne, will offer clues to the cause of Australia’s megafauna extinction


“Feral cats cause havoc on Australian wildlife“. 22 November 2016 By Deakin Research:
Dr Tim Doherty, a Research Fellow from Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences, claims feral cat management should be prioritised and improved in a new research paper that outlines ways to tackle the problem………………
Deakin Research: Researchers at Deakin University are calling for improved management of feral cats, due to the damage they are causing Australian wildlife

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“People are hunting primates, bats, and other mammals to extinction“. 18 October 2016 By Elizabeth Pennisi: 
The passenger pigeon was hunted to extinction in North America in the 19th century – and hundreds of mammals are now headed for the same fate. That’s the conclusion of ecologists who are taking the first look at the effects of hunting on land mammals around the world……………….
Science: Some 301 species – including 126 primates, 26 bats, and 65 ungulates such as deer and wild pigs – could be on their way out

More information can be found on:

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“It’s raining feral cats and dogs on social media“. 14 October 2016 By Patricia Karvelas: 
Ecologist Dr Euan Ritchie guides us through what’s been in his social media feeds, from dog bounties to #scicomm……………….
ABC RN: Euan’s social media under the microscope

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“Why Victoria’s dingo and ‘wild dog’ bounty is doomed to miss its target“. 14 October 2016 By Euan Ritchie and Arian Wallach: 
On any given night, many farmers go to sleep worrying about what they might wake up to in the morning. Few things are more stressful than seeing your livestock, such as sheep, lying dead or seriously injured in the paddock……………….
The Conversation: Reducing livestock, especially sheep, being attacked and killed – what’s the best way to deal with the current situation?

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“Invasive predators are eating the world’s animals to extinction – and the worst is close to home“. 20 September 2016 By Tim Doherty, Chris Dickman, Dale Nimmo and Euan Ritchie:
Invasive species are a threat to wildlife across the globe – and invasive, predatory mammals are particularly damaging……………….
The Conversation: How can we stop these mammals eating away at our threatened wildlife?

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“Paradise lost: we’ve destroyed most of the world’s wilderness“. 8 September 2016 By Alice Klein:
Blink and you may miss it. Wilderness now covers less than a quarter of land on Earth, and could disappear this century unless robust protection measures are introduced……………….
New Scientist: Wilderness areas are defined as ecologically intact landscapes that are mostly free from human disturbance

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“Could lack of dingoes explain why Tasmania’s bandicoots are not wary of dogs?“. 31 August 2016 By Dani Cooper and Genelle Weule:
Bandicoots on the island state of Tasmania fail to recognise dogs as a threat, despite co-existing with the domesticated predator for 200 years. Read CIE’s PhD candidate Ms Sarah Maclagan comments……………….
ABC News: While bandicoots in Sydney have learned to avoid domestic dogs, they do not recognise cats as a predator

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“Brumby cull is vital for environment, say ecology experts“. 31 August 2016 By Mark Dunn:
About 5000 wild brumbies in Victoria’s sensitive Alpine region should be culled to prevent further environmental damage and a threat to endangered rodents and skinks, an ecology expert, professor Don Driscoll, leading a group of 41 academics said………………
Herald Sun: Seeking support for the use of marksmen in helicopters to eradicate the wild brumby population

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“EcoCheck: Australia’s vast, majestic northern savannas need more care“. 25 August 2016 By Euan Ritchie and Brett Murphy:
These are the largest and most intact ecosystem of their kind on Earth. But how are our vast northern landscapes faring environmentally, and what challenges are on the horizon?………………
The Conversation: EcoCheck for these large and most intact ecosystem of their kind on Earth

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“New to science black corals filmed off Tasmania“. 24 August 2016 By AG Staff  Writer:
Experienced deep ocean divers acting as citizen scientists have taken the first-ever up-close look at a stunning deep granite reef off Bicheno, eastern Tasmania. CIE’s member, Dr Jacquomo Monk, is part of the team surveying these amazing ecosystems!………………
Australian Geographic: Citizen scientists have captured the first-ever footage of a reef off the coast of eastern Tasmania

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“Zebra finch parents tell eggs: It’s hot outside“. 19 August 2016 By Science Magazine:
A new study, published today in Science by CIE members Dr Mylene Mariette and Professor Kate Buchanan, reveals that prenatal sounds matter a lot more than we realised for young development, and this may prove very handy for adaptation to a warming climate………………
Watch this videos (the first is from AAAS Science) to see how the parents talk to their chicks before birth:

More information can be found on:

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“The rise of citizen science is great news for our native wildlife“. 16 August 2016 By Euan Ritchie, Jenny Davis, Jenny Martin, Sarah Maclagan:
For some species, our time to see them is rapidly running out. We know that unfortunately many native animals face considerable threats from habitat loss, introduced cats and foxes, and climate change, among others………………
The Conversation: Australia is renowned for its iconic wildlife. We need accurate and up-to-date information about where our wildlife persists and in what numbers.

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“Natural selection may be the answer to the cancer riddle, but can we beat evolution?“. 8 August 2016 By Beata Ujvari:
Essential organs tasked with keeping us alive and reproducing – such as the heart, brain or uterus – may have evolved better protection against cancer than larger and paired organs, we have proposed………………
The Conversation: Humans can more easily tolerate tumours in large or paired organs than in small, critical organs

More information can be found on:

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“Battling Bird Flu: Saving Wild Birds and Humans“. 25 July 2016, Project by EAAFP:
The avian influenza virus is still a major global problem. However, the most common victims are actually birds, not humans. What do we know about bird flu, and how can we control it?

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“Why do so many Australians love feeding wild birds? Deakin research hopes to find out“. 28 May 2016 By Deakin Media:
Deakin University scientists are wondering what the implications of so many people feeding birds might be and if the food being offered to them is potentially harmful to their health.
Project leader Dr Gráinne Cleary, from Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology, within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences, said it was Australia’s largest ever study on the impact of bird feeding and watering ever undertaken………………
Deakin Media: What are the implications of so many people feeding birds?

More information can be found on:

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“Tracing Western Australia’s pest starlings“. 28 May 2016 By Robyn Williams:
Starlings attack fruit crops, foul grain stores and transmit disease in livestock. Their droppings can also be annoying………………
ABC – The Science Show: In some parts of Western Australia, starlings are a pest

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“Deakin University ecologist calls for Australian’s to eat differently“. 23 May 2016 By Tom Elliot:
Could eating cane toads and horses help the environment? Euan Ritchie, ecologist at Deakin University spoke with Tom Elliot………………
3AW News Talk: Euan says it’s all about Education

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“Shrinking shorebirds pay the price for Arctic warming when they reach the tropics“. 12 May 2016 By Dani Cooper:
In a new study published today in the journal Science, an international team details how the warming of the Arctic by climate change could be responsible for drops in the population of a sub-species of red knot bird………………
ABC News: An iconic shorebird that migrates from Siberia to West Africa is sending warning signals about the impact of climate change on the planet

More information can be found on:

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“Natural antibodies could combat Tasmanian devil cancer: Deakin research“. 4 May 2016 By Deakin Media:
Deakin University scientists may have found a way to stop the cancer that has been killing Tasmanian devils for the past 20 years.
Dr Beata Ujvari, from Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences, investigated differences in molecules found in the devils’ immune systems, comparing those that had the cancer, known as the Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease, and those that didn’t………………
Deakin Media: The devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) could actually already hold the solution

More information can be found on:

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“Citizen scientists offer birds-eye view of Aussie backyards for conservation“. 1 May 2016 By Deakin Media:
Deakin University scientists have gained the biggest ever birds-eye view of Australian backyards, offering a fascinating insight into the variety, number and even size of avian wildlife drinking and washing in bird baths across the country.
Research Fellow with Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences Dr Gráinne Cleary drew upon the observatory skills of more than 4,000 residents to find out what was going on in their backyard bird baths………………
Deakin Media: In a very dry continent like Australia artificial water resources such as bird baths can be very important for birds

More information can be found on:

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“Deakin Researchers have taken to the sky to measure the impact of storms on Warrnambool’s beaches“. 23 April 2016 By Rachael Houlihan:
Researchers from the Deakin University Warrnambool Campus have taken to the sky to document any damage and have also published a new paper on the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, for assessing the impact of storm bite on sandy beaches and coastal ecosystems………………
The Standard: advances in drone technology allowed for collection of aerial imagery and topography at a resolution suitable for assessing change in coastal ecosystems

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“Nature is neglected in this election campaign – at its and our own peril“. 19 April 2016 by Don Driscoll & Euan Ritchie :
Our natural heritage – the plants, animals and other organisms that help define Australia’s identity – are in dire straits. Yet this biodiversity crisis is barely mentioned in political discourse, nor is it foremost in the public consciousness………………
The Conversation: Actions needed to conserve our natural heritage

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“Tracking the nighttime travels of the cryptic powerful owl“. 18 April 2016 By Bridie Smith:
How much space does a powerful owl need to live the good life in Melbourne’s suburbs? Researchers trapping and tagging up to 10 of Australia’s largest owl species are about to find out………………
The Age: The largest owl in Australia, the powerful owl is found in parks and suburban areas

More information can be found on:

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“Scientists discover five “Drowned Apostles” near Great Ocean Road“. 10 March 2016:
Australia’s iconic tourist attraction, the Twelve Apostles, has received an unlikely boost in numbers with the discovery of five extra limestone columns hidden deep below the water………………
Deakin News: The never-before-seen sea stacks, located 6km offshore from the Great Ocean Road and 50m beneath the water’s surface

More information can be found on:

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“Ecology on the radio“. 9 March 2016:
Sundays are about to get a bit busier for Deakin University ecologist Dr Euan Ritchie as he joins the on-air team of radio science show Einstein a Go-Go………………
Deakin News: Einstein a Go-Go goes to air on Sundays from 11am to 12 noon on radio Triple R in Melbourne. Dr Ritchie will take up his co-host role from Sunday 13 March

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Searchin’ for an urgent answer to urchin breakout”. 21 February 2016 By John Elder:
Corner Inlet, one of the state’s most prolific fishing grounds, is part of Nooramunga Marine Park, just east of Wilsons Promontory. What’s occurring there is being characterised by Parks Victoria as a mystery and a rarity; by Deakin University researchers as a threat to biodiversity and a probable loss of countless tonnes of ancient blue carbon; and by fisherman as a curse on their livelihood that’s easily fixed if bureaucracy would only step aside………………
The Sydney Morning Herald: Purple sea urchins have invaded the rare seagrass beds of a Victorian marine park

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“Bushfires are pushing species towards extinction”. 11 February 2016 By Tim Doherty, Emma Burgess, Martine Maron and Robert Davis:
Massive bushfires in recent months have tragically claimed people’s lives and destroyed their homes. These events are becoming more common as our warming and drying climate increases the frequency, intensity and extent of fires……………….
The Conversation: Extreme fire events are pushing Australian wildlife towards extinction

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“Underground formations reveal wet past of Australia’s Nullarbor Plain“. 9 February 2016 By Bob Yirka:
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia has found evidence that suggests that a desert region in Australia experienced a relatively short burst of wetter weather approximately five million years ago. The team has published a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences detailing their study of stalagmites and stalactites in caves in the area and why they believe what they found might give a hint of what the future holds for Australia………………
Phys.org: examined fossilised pollen inside stalagmites to shed new light on the Nullarbor’s climate history

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“Shark nets ‘do nothing’: 50 years of data ‘shows chances of attack unaffected by mitigation programs'”. 8 February 2016 By Geoff Thompson, Mary Fallon and Elise Worthington:
Associate Professor Laurie Laurenson from Deakin University’s CIE has analysed 50 years of data about shark mitigation programs and coastal populations in NSW and South Africa……………….
ABC News: reducing the density of local shark populations did not reduce the likelihood of shark attack

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“Climate change makes chicks hatch early”. 3 February 2016:
A study, in which CIE’s Christa Beckmann took part, has found that climate change is affecting how quickly bird eggs develop and hatch; meaning warmer temperatures, particularly increasing frequencies of heat waves, may spell trouble for our feathered friends……………….
PHYS.ORG: the effect of warmer temperatures on the embryonic development of zebra finches

More information can be found on:

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“Getting on board with Deakin’s Tram Talks”. 27 January 2016:
Deakin’s Tram Talks series of mini lectures have been launched in the ‘world’s first mobile lecture theatre’ – a distinctively decorated Melbourne tram……………….
Deakin News: Dr Euan Ritchie from the CIE discusses natural predators in the Australian wild and the valuable role they play in our ecosystem

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“Genetic changes in birds could throw light on human mitochondrial diseases”. 6 January 2016:
Deakin University and UNSW Australia researchers, including our own Lee Ann Rollins. and Ben Fanson., have made a rare observation of rapid evolution in action in the wild, documenting the spread of a newly arisen genetic mutation in invasive starlings, which could shed light on mitochondrial disease in humans……………….
Deakin Research Stories: An important step forward in understanding how populations respond to a changing environment

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“Birds set to return to Lake Eyre to breed as inland lakes fills with water”. 5 January 2016 by Elise Fantin:
Deakin University researcher Reece Pedler said bird species, including the vulnerable banded stilt, use the desert lake as a breeding ground……………….
ABC News: Waterbirds are expected to flock to Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre now that it has begun to fill with water

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“Putting the Bite Back into Biodiversity Conservation”. 20 December 2015 by Euan Ritchie:
Deakin University Alumni Webinar about the ecological roles of predators and their importance to the conservation of biodiversity:

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“An inaugural inspiring women fellowship is awarded to Dr Emily Nicholson“. 3 December 2015:
The inaugural inspiring women fellowships, funded by the Victorian Government through the Office of the Lead Scientist and delivered by veski, ensure outstanding female researchers get the support they need to juggle career and carer commitments and remain competitive in their fields of endeavour……………..
veski.org.au: Victoria’s first female Governor presents state’s first inspiring women fellowship

More information can be found on:

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“Wetlands may be carbon kings”. December 2015:
The carbon storage potential of Victoria’s inland wetlands is being measured for the first time as part of a project co-ordinated by Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority……………..
Country News – Water Talk: Deakin University scientists to visit 100 wetlands across Victoria over the next six months to identify carbon sink ‘hot spots’ (PDF)

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Negotiating parental duties key to a happy nest“. 29 November 2015. By Bridie Smith: Ever get annoyed that you’re carrying more of the parenting load than your partner? You’re not alone. Birds do too.
Deakin University ecologist Mylene Mariette has found that zebra finch mums sharing nesting duties are acutely aware of how much time dad spends away from home………………
Canberra Times: Bird’s shared parenting habits

More information can be found on:

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“Salmon research worth its salt”. 18 November 2015:
Deakin has signed a new research agreement with Australia’s largest Atlantic salmon producer, Tassal Operations, to improve the welfare and survival of thousands of salmon that are transferred from freshwater hatcheries every year to sea cages………………
Deakin Research Stories: Deakin will join with Australia’s largest salmon producer to improve the welfare of cultured Atlantic salmon

More information can be found on:

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“AMP Tomorrow Maker 2015 – Peter Macreadie“. 18 November 2015:
In 2015, AMP’s Tomorrow Fund awarded $1 million in grants to 42 amazing Australians of all ages, interests and abilities. Marine scientist Peter Macreadie is on is on a mission to raise awareness of the carbon storing potential of Australia’s coastal ecosystems and the need to protect these habitats……………..

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“Kelp is on its way”. 5 November 2015:
Lecturer in marine biology and ecology at CIE in Warrnambool Alecia Bellgrove used crowd-funding to fund her initial research into the nutritional and taste aspects of local seaweeds compared to their traditional Japanese counterparts……………..
ABC Radio National: When it comes to healthy eating the Japanese are well ahead of the game

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“Sharks the good guys when it comes to climate, research says”. 29 September 2015:
According to the Deakin University scientists, when humans kill sharks they cause instability in the ocean’s natural food chain, which can ultimately lead to the release of carbon from the sea floor into the earth’s atmosphere………………
Northern Star: Sharks are the unlikely heroes protecting humans from the perils of climate change

More information can be found on:

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“Predictable evolution: bad news for toads, good news for their predators”. 16 September 2015:
Researchers reveal that, under certain circumstances, the process of evolution can be highly predictable, especially when there are limited solutions to a particular problem, such as resistance to dangerous toxins……………..
The Guardian: Most Australian goannas die after snacking on cane toads

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“Spider Crabs: No rest for the wicked”. 27 July 2015. By Elodie Camprasse:
Migration – when people hear this term, they usually picture herds of mammals (including people) or flocks of birds en route to places where they can find better conditions.
However, did you know that Melbourne has a migration of its own in its underwater backyard? Giant spider crabs (Leptomithrax gaimardii) indeed put on a show every Winter in Port Phillip Bay. If you let me, I will take you on one of the most amazing dives where I was witness to this amazing event. Don’t worry though – you won’t have to get wet!……………..
Wild Melbourne: A giant spider crabs’ danger zone

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“Federal Government to declare war on feral cats”. 16 July 2015. By Tom Nightingale:
The Federal Government is today launching an attack on feral cats at Australia’s first Threatened Species Summit. The Environment Minister Greg Hunt says they are a serious threat to native species and that he wants the feral animals eradicated from five islands and 10 mainland enclosures within five years……………..
ABC – The World Today: Strategy to include a target of two million feral cats culled by 2020.

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“Bass Strait’s artificial structures seal the deal for hungry fur seals”. 2 July 2015. By Bridie Smith:
A study, conducted by Associate Professor John Arnould, looking at the feeding behaviour of Australian fur seals in Bass Strait has found the animals benefit from the shipwrecks, pipelines and cables in their underwater world……………..
The Age: Fur seals, which feed almost exclusively on the seafloor, appear to have cottoned-on

More information can be found on:

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“How coastland development ‘blue carbon’ contributes to climate change”. 28 June 2015. By John Elder:
Coastal developers should be paying to offset air pollution – not from their bulldozers and or dredging barges, but from the tonnes of ancient carbon released into the atmosphere when wetlands are drained and dug up.
This is the view of Dr Peter Macreadie, award-winning marine ecologist and Australian Research Council Fellow, who has just completed the first major survey of “blue carbon” stocks along 2000 kilometers of Victorian coastline……………..
Brisbane Times: Wetlands bury carbon faster than trees and keep it from escaping for much longer

More information can be found on:

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“Killing cats, rats and foxes is no silver bullet for saving wildlife”. 12 June 2015. By Tim Doherty, Chris Dickman, Dale NimmoEuan Ritchie:
Cats, rats and foxes have wrought havoc on Australian wildlife and ecosystems. Known as “invasive mammalian predators”, these are species that have established populations outside their native range……………..
The Conversation: Management of invasive predators is likely to benefit from employing more integrated approaches

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“Research in Deakin’s School of Life and Environmental Sciences” 9 June 2015. By Deakin Uni:
Researchers from the CIE within Deakin University’s School of Life and Environmental Sciences talk about research within the school, which is part of the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment. For more information visit http://deakin.edu.au/sebe/research.

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“Climate change could wipe out Australian mammals: Deakin research”. 5 June 2015. By Rebecca Tucker @ Deakin Media:
Australian native animals could be under threat of extinction from climate change, with a unique longitudinal study by Deakin’s CIE scientists (Associate Professor John White, Dr Raylene Cooke and Dr Dale Nimmo) finding our small mammal populations are suffering the ravages of long-term low rainfall conditions and intense wildfires……………..
Deakin Media Release: Investigation into the impact of major bushfires in the Grampians

More information can be found on:

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“Deakin ecologist embarks on big roo count to help save mammals”. 25 May 2015. By Deakin Media:
A Deakin University ecologist (Dr Euan Ritchie, from Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology) has launched a fundraising campaign to support his journey into the far northern tropics to collect information on kangaroos and wallabies as part of his mission to save them from extinction in northern Australia…………….
Deakin Media Release: While we may have an overabundance of some kangaroos in southern states, some species may be disappearing at the other end of the country

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“Dingoes, desalinators and a damn good roof!”. 24 May 2015. By Matt Smith:
We head out bush, along the Dingo Fence, to see why the Great Wall approach to protecting livestock needs a drastic rethink for the 21st Century……………
ABC Radio National: Future Tense showcases three innovative research projects which aim to improve the environment (Dr Euan Ritchie @ 19 Min 40 Sec)

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“Study backs seaweed’s carbon capturing potential”. 19 May 2015:
Scientists from UTS and Deakin University have carried out the first investigation of how a diverse range of coastal plants and seaweed (macroalgae) can contribute to “blue carbon” stocks, the carbon in leaves, sediments and roots that is naturally captured, or sequestered, by plants in coastal habitats……………
PHYS.org: Hopes for the potential of coastal plants and seaweeds to store carbon

More information can be found on:

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“Mallee needs more dingoes: expert”. 18 May 2015. By Matteo Gagliardi:
An ecologist with extensive research in Mallee habitats believes propping up dingo numbers in the region will help control local pest species and problems associated with planned burning. Senior lecturer in ecology at Deakin University Dr Euan Ritchie told attendees of a biological sciences seminar at the University of Queensland on Friday that interactions within Mallee ecosystem food chains were out of balance……………
The Guardian: The apex predator of the Mallee landscape, the dingo, is on the decline

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“Accounting for career breaks”. 15 May 2015. By Emily Nicholson:
Early in my scientific career, I pursued research while remaining blissfully unaware of the difficulty of securing a permanent academic position, especially for women and mothers. I drifted happily through a Ph.D. and two postdocs abroad, guided by interesting science, people, and places—and a nonscientist husband with ideas about where he wanted to live. It wasn’t until I had been a postdoc for several years, with two children and a third on the way, that I recognized the need to adopt a sound strategic approach to securing a tenured faculty position, particularly given my career breaks……………
Science (AAAS): If she managed this working part time, with breaks and sleep deprivation, imagine what she’ll do once the kids are older!

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“Environmental science turns to crowdfunding to pay the bills”. 15 May 2015. By Christopher Doyle:
With the not-for-profit space increasingly competitive and government coffers smaller than ever, environmental scientists are turning to crowdfunding to pay their way…………….
ABC Environment: The appeal of crowdfunding is largely based on its wide reach

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“The Dingoes Ate My Kitten”. 5 May 2015. By Brandon Keim:
Feral cats are an invasive species that kills billions of wild animals each year, threatening entire species with extinction. They’re also extremely difficult to control and, well, they’re just so damn cute. How could anyone eradicate as a pest a critter who just wants to play with packing peanuts and hide in boxes?……………
WIRED.com: Interactions between dingoes and feral cats may be our best bet

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“Antarctic stations flush with success: new waste water system to save sick rock cod”. 26 April 2015. By John Elder:
A million-dollar water treatment plant is being installed at one of Australia’s Antarctic stations in a move to protect sea life, including the Antarctic rock cod, from being poisoned by poorly filtered sewage and grey water. The treatment plant is a result of an environmental study done by a Deakin University PhD candidate Patricia Corbett, who spent the austral summer of 2012-2013 at Davis station……………
The Sydney Morning Herald: Deakin research saves Antarctic fish from wastewater fate

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Beata Ujvari, Centre for Integrative Ecology, talking about “the evolutionary dynamics of transmissible cancers” at the International Society for Evolution, Medicine and Public Health Inaugural Meeting, March 19-21, 2015, Tempe, AZ, USA:

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“Great bowerbirds of northern Australia”. 19 March 2015. By Becky Crew:
Meet the lovely great bowerbird (Chlamydera nuchalis) and the wonderful magenta crest that adorns the back of his head and the nape of his neck. Found in northern Australia from Broome over in WA, to Cape York Peninsula and down as far as Mount Isa, this small bird keeps to the dense bushlands, forests, and mangrove swamps that can sustain its elaborate courtship routines……………
Australian Geographic: Male bowerbirds may look like they’re at the mercy of picky females, but these males have an optical illusion up their sleeves

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“Victorian koalas are eating themselves out of house and home”. 11 March 2015. By  Ben Moore & Desley Whisson:
The “secret culling” of 700 koalas by the Victorian government at Cape Otway in late 2013 and early 2014 made front-page news when it was revealed this month. The headlines inevitably provoked outrage……………
The Conversation: All about the “secret culling” of 700 koalas by the Victorian government at Cape Otway

More information can be found on:

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“Fishes’ innate food choice could change with the environment”. 4 March 2015. By Rebecca Tucker:
The fact that fish choose their food based on what colours they can see, as opposed to how it tastes, is an inherited trait that could have implications for the evolution in the animal kingdom, new Deakin University research has found……………
PHYS.org: Fishes’ ability to find food depends on what colours they see

More information can be found on:

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“Massive Swarms of Jellyfish Are Wreaking Havoc on Fish Farms and Power Plants”. 3 March 2015. By Ben Sharples:
The marine animals have shut power plants from Sweden to the U.S. while killing thousands of farmed fish in pens held off the U.K. coast. GPS devices normally used to track the behavior of house cats were attached to 18 barrel-jellyfish off the coast of northern France. The study upended previous assumptions about their movement……………
Bloomberg: As the oceans get warmer, jellyfish are causing pain beyond their sting

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“Seaweed research gains international attention”. 2 February 2015. By  Nick Ansell:
Studies involving the seaweed of the south-west are set to be recognised in a German television documentary, centring around the attractions of the Great Ocean Road.
In a credit to her studies on the edibility of seaweed, Deakin University’s Dr Alecia Bellgrove will feature in the documentary……………
The Standard: Edible seaweed project to air on German television station Arte

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“Mourn our lost mammals, while helping the survivors battle back”. 23 January 2015. By Dale NimmoEuan Ritchie and Thomas Newsome:
Australia has the worst rate of mammal extinctions in the world. More than a third have become extinct since European settlement, or are currently threatened with extinction. But what about the survivors? And what can we do to prevent further losses?…………..
The Conversation: Can we help those who survived to flourish again or are we fighting the inevitable?

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“Jellyfish go against the flow”. 22 January 2015. By Emily Conover :
Although jellyfish may appear to be aquatic vagabonds, they don’t just drift aimlessly through the oceans. Instead, a new study has found, jellyfish can sense currents and swim against them…………..
Science (AAAS): Jellyfish don’t just drift aimlessly

More information can be found on:

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“Animal instincts could help in cancer fight, Deakin researcher says”. 22 January 2015. By Greg Dundas:
Deakin University biologist Beata Ujvari has teamed with colleagues at France’s Montpellier University for the groundbreaking study.
Rather than examining and experimenting on animals in a laboratory, the scientists plan to observe creatures in the wild, where natural instincts will not be inhibited…………..
Geelong Advertiser: A Geelong researcher is fighting deadly human cancers by studying how wild animals instinctively self-medicate and shield themselves from the diseases.

More information can be found on:

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“Slow and steady wins the race of the underwater world: Deakin research”. 21 January 2015. By Deakin Media:
Slow and steady doesn’t just win the race between a tortoise and a hare, with new Deakin University research showing sluggish, shy and slow-growing underwater creatures have a better chance of avoiding death by fishing hook than their bigger and bolder counterparts…………..
Deakin Media: Come get me – small and slow underwater creatures have a better chance of avoiding death by fishing hook than their bigger and bolder family and friends.

More information can be found on:

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“Birds feast on highway toadkill”. 12 January 2015. By Daniel Bateman:
In a paper recently published in the Journal of Wildlife Management, researchers Dr Christa Beckmann (CIE, Deakin University) and Professor Richard Shine wrote that scavengers played a large role in removing toad carcasses from roads………….
The Cairns Post: The mystery of what happens to cane toads that get squished on the road may have been solved.

More information can be found on:

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“This summer at the beach, watch out for the world’s biggest turtle”. 17 December 2014. By Graeme Hays & Margie Morrice:
In parts of Australia – New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania – you might think you’re far from turtle habitats. In fact you have the best chance of seeing the largest turtle, and the fourth-heaviest reptile, in the world.
If you’re in southern Australia, keep your eyes peeled for the world’s largest turtle, the leatherback. If you do, you can report sightings to researchers at Deakin University, which will help scientists answer vital questions about these creatures…………
The Conversation: Going to the beach this summer? Help researchers in gathering information about the world’s largest turtle, the leatherback.

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“Birds of a feather flock together to thrive despite stress: Deakin research”. 17 December 2014. By Deakin Media:
Australia’s avian populations may be more resistant to environmental variations, such as climate change, than scientists may have thought, new Deakin University research shows…………..
Deakin Media: Developmental stress can uncouple relationships between physiology and behaviour

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“We have more parks than ever, so why is wildlife still vanishing?”. 12 November 2014. By Bob Pressey & Euan Ritchie:
While we can never know for sure, an extraordinary number of animals and plants are threatened with extinction — up to a third of all mammals and over a tenth of all birds. And the problem is getting worse.
At the same time, we have more land and sea than ever in protected areas (“parks”) — more than 200,000 protected areas covering about 15% of the world’s land area and 3% of the oceans. So why are protected areas making so little difference?…………
The Conversation: How come protected areas making so little difference?

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“Wet beaches drown sea turtles”. 24 October 2014. By Lydia Chain:
Climate changes may be wreaking havoc on the beaches where leatherback sea turtles nest. As sea levels rise and rain pounds on the sand, sea turtle nests get soggy. This could spell trouble for the charismatic reptile, which at six feet long, is the largest living turtle…………
Science Line: Climate change makes beaches wetter, hurting the survival of sea turtle hatchlings.

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“Would You Like Seaweed With That?”. Public lecture by Dr Alecia Bellgrove, October 14, 2014.
Alecia presented a range of findings from the taste testing last year at Deakin University at Warrnambool:

More information can be found on:

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“Desert birds fly more than 2000 kilometers to find ephemeral lakes”. 14 October 2014. By Sid Perkins:
A species of Australian shorebird can detect and then quickly fly to short-lived lakes that form in the middle of the desert after a significant rainfall, new research suggests………..
Science/AAAS website: In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists strapped tracking devices to 21 birds (banded stilt) and monitored their movements.

More information can be found on:

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“Top dogs: Australian predators can provide 24-7 feral cat control”. 14 October 2014. By Euan Ritchie:
As companion animals, cats are rivalled only by dogs. Our love affair with them is hardly surprising: they are elegant, graceful and affectionate animals. But they are also highly adaptable and successful hunters……….
ABC Environment: Feral cats are devastating our wildlife, so we need a long-term, sustainable solution. This is where Australia’s natural predators come in.

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“Rosella a key to fatal bird virus: Deakin”. 3 October 2014. By Noel Murphy:
DEAKIN researchers hope to stave off an extinction threat to Aussie parrots and potentially up to one in four birds worldwide.
Key to their study are the varied colours of the brightly plumaged crimson rosella and their link to the deadly beak and feather disease virus. PhD student Justin Eastwood said the crimson rosella’s variety of extraordinary colours appeared linked to the virus.
According to Dr Mathew Berg, project author, the virus challenged wildlife monitoring and captive breeding programs………..
The Geelong Independent: Australian crimson rosellas could hold key to solving a deadly bird virus.

More information can be found on:

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“Great shorebird migration under threat”. 27 September 2014. By Andrew Darby:
Birds are disappearing by the tens of thousands on their globe-spanning flights, mainly because of the loss of all-important “refuelling” habitat, scientists warn.
Around Australia, curlew sandpiper numbers are declining 10 per cent a year, meaning it faces extinction within a decade, according to CIE director Marcel Klaassen………..
The Age: Imminent danger to the epic migration of shorebirds from Australia to their Arctic breeding grounds.

More information can be found on:

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“Deakin avian expert warns migratory birds are flying to Australia on just a wing and a prayer”. 25 September 2014. By Deakin Media:
Millions of migratory birds that fly tens of thousands of kilometres between their homes in Australia and Siberia are facing annihilation as development destroys the vital feeding grounds they rely on during their epic journeys, a Deakin University avian expert (Director of Deakin’s Centre for Integrative Ecology Professor Marcel Klaassen) has warned…………
Deakin Media: The rate of decline among some of these bird species is such a dramatic drop in numbers as to be truly depressing.

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“Photographer captures scientists’ frightened responses to climate change discussionss”. 25 August 2014. By Priscilla Frank:
According to Peter Macreadie (honorary fellow-visitor with the CIE) IPCC predicts that the impacts of climate change will be catastrophic. This affects everybody. Nobody is safe. We’re going to lose low lying countries, there will be a loss of live stock, potential wide spread famine and species extinction………..
Huffington Post: Scared scientists project

For more information on the Scared Scientists project CLICK HERE.

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“Ecotourism rise hits whales”. 26 August 2014. By Daniel Cressey:
Boat trips to watch whales and dolphins may increasingly be putting the survival of marine mammals at risk, conservationists have warned. Research published this year shows that the jaunts can affect cetacean behaviour and stress levels in addition to causing deaths from collisions…….
Nature: Desire to observe whales and dolphins up close is affecting animals’ behaviour

A paper (Inferring energy expenditure from respiration rates in minke whales to measure the effects of whale watching boat interactions) written by Fredrik Christiansen was cited in the above article.

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“Birds can sniff out their own species”. 25 August 2014. By Karl Gruber:
Crimson rosellas (Platycercus elegans), can identify their own subspecies based on the odour of another bird’s plumage, according to a new study conducted by Milla Mihailova, PhD student at Deakin University……….
Australian Geographic: For the first time, it’s been shown that birds can sniff out their own kind by the smell of their feathers

More information can be found on:

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“Little penguins hunt in synchronised packs”. 14 August 2014. Stuart Gary:
Little penguins prefer searching for food in groups and synchronise their dives to help catch prey, a new Australian study has found……….
ABC Science: Exploring the foraging behaviour at sea of little penguins (Eudyptula minor)

More information can be found on:

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“Burnoff policies could be damaging habitats for 100 years”. 8 August 2014. By Andrew Bennett, Dale Nimmo & Michael Clarke:
A recent research conducted in south-eastern Australia’s Murray Mallee region by the Mallee Fire and Biodiversity Team found that current burnoff policies could be damaging habitats for 100 years..…….
The Conversation: Burnoffs in the mallee region of Victoria may have done lasting damage to the environment

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Warmer world to push sea turtle numbers up“. 19 May 2014. By Rachel Sullivan & “Hotter climate could turn sea turtles all-girl”. 19 May 2014. By Peter Hannam:
While warming temperatures will produce more female than male sea turtle hatchings, sea turtle populations will not crash — at least for the next few decades, a new study suggests.
According to research team member Professor Graeme Hays, Chair of Marine Science at Deakin University, this is the first time to include data on breeding periodicity collected by satellite tagging to show that the tendency of males to breed more frequently than females will help offset female skewed hatchling sex ratios…..
ABC Science: worldwide concern that increasing temperatures will result in all-female populations, ultimately leading to their extinction.

The Sunday Morning Herald: Rising temperatures mean more female turtles.

More information can be found on:

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ABC News Satellite Tracking the Elusive Flatback TturtleProf Graeme Hays on ABC News (6 May 2014) – Satellite tracking the elusive flatback turtle.

Watch the full interview here.

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“Flatback turtle migration routes mapped”. 1 May 2014. By Signe Cane:
Researchers from Deakin University, Swansea University (UK), and Pendoley Environmental consultancy in Western Australia spent seven years tracking turtle migration from their breeding grounds off the coast of Pilbara region in Western Australia.

According to Professor Graeme Hays (Deakin University) this is the first extensive study of its kind on flatback turtles, using satellite tracking.…….
Australian Geographic: The migratory paths of the little-studied flatback sea turtle have been mapped by a satellite tracking study.

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“Digging into yabby research in Bellbrae”. 24 April 2014. By James Taylor:
Otway Yabbies owner Stephen Chara and Associate Proffesor Peter Biro from the university’s Centre for Integrative Ecology have joined forces to explore yabby growth, with a little help from a civil contractor………
Surf Coast Times: Long-term effects of harvesting yabbies study is expected to be ready by the start of the next yabby season in October.

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“Male bowerbirds master the art of illusion”. 2 April 2014. By Dani Cooper:
In a move that would make Houdini proud, researchers (Lead researcher Professor John Endler, Deakin University) have found male bowerbirds are embracing the power of illusion to get their girl…….
ABC Science: Australian researchers have found a strong link between male mating success and the quality of their illusions.

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“Drone beams ‘mind-blowing’ coastal views of Warrnambool”. 8 March 2014. By Jono Pech:
The joint partnership with Deakin University aims to provide in-depth detail of Warrnambool’s coastal environments and habitat, including shoreline erosion and wildlife behaviours……
The Standard: A coastal landscape mapping project using aerial drones is adding a new dimension of insight to Deakin University research.

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“Lorne to host international event”. 6 March 2014.
The 2014 Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping (GeoHab) Conference will be hosted in Lorne this year (5th-9th May 2014), bringing world renowned marine experts to our region……
Surf Coast Times: Promoting a better understanding of the distributions of marine habitat.

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“Goldfields deluge attracts thousands of breeding banded stilts”. 21 February 2014.
Reece Pedler, from Deakin University’s Centre for Integrative Ecology, said banded stilts somehow know it has rained and arrive within days. Here they feast on abundant brine shrimp and build thousands of nests…..
Herald Sun: A MAJOR bird breeding spectacle is underway in WA’s Goldfields region for the first time in almost 20 years.

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“Promoting Bung Bratak to Australians, especially among the intellectual fraternity and tourists”. 6 December 2013:
Deakin University of Melbourne, Australia has described Bung Bratak as one of the best places in Borneo for research in botany and the natural environment…..
Borneo Post Online: Bung Bratak ideal for research in botany.

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“Expert says south-west fishing industry must face up to challenge of climate change”. 18 September 2013. By Clare Quirk:
Professor Gerry Quinn, from Deakin’s school of life and environmental sciences, said climate change was occurring, therefore we need to adapt…..
The Standard: The impact of climate change on fisheries and marine environments.

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“Seaweed goes from beach to forks”. 23 August 2013. By Sean McComish:
About 50 pioneers ventured into the culinary unknown, putting clumps of seaweed from the deep on their folks. Dr Alecia Bellgrove said most people…….
The Standard: Groundbreaking study that challenges the logic of what we eat and why.

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“The insidious threat to our natural heritage”. 19 August 2013. Eminent Australians:
Moves by the Napthine government towards the privatisation and commercialisation of national parks are a betrayal of public trust, writes a group of eminent Australians (Associate Professor Geoff Wescott).
The Age: Government policy that starts the journey of incremental privatisation and commercialisation of national parks would be a betrayal of public trust.

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More GFN research: red knots and two flyways” . 6 August 2013. By Victor Barry:
Dr Jutta Leyrer, from Deakin University, became interested in waders (shorebirds) in her native Germany before embarking on a PhD in The Netherlands on red knots…….
A Question of Balance: Red knots can also flexibly adjust their stomach capacity to maximise fuel intake.

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“Technology a new dawn for Deakin University, says new Warrnambool campus head” 2 August 2013. By Everard Himmelreich:
Professor Gerry Quinn, the new head of Deakin University’s Warrnambool campus, says evolving communication technology would allow it to reach into areas well beyond the region…….
The Standard: Continuing focus will be to provide a place where south-west residents could study locally.

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“Scientists complete underwater bioscan of the iconic Twelve Apostles” 31 July 2013:
An underwater bioscan was undertaken as joint project between Museum Victoria, Parks Victoria and Deakin University…….
The Guardian: Monitoring the health and extent of marine life within the Twelve Apostles Marine National park.

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“Warrnambool food-lovers needed to try seaweed” 31 July 2013. By Steve Hynes:
Warranambool foodies are invited to volunteer their taste buds for a project that could form the basis of a new industry…….
The Standard: Taste trials as the first step in a move towards possible commercial harvest of local seaweed.

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“Push to harvest our seaweed” 29 July 2013. By Mandy Squires:
Local waters could become a world food bowl as scientists look to harvest nutritionally rich seaweed…….
Geelong Advertiser: Local seaweed be compared with Asian-grown seaweed.

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“New images reveal a rich world under Victoria’s iconic Twelve Apostles” 29 July 2013. By Dan Conifer:
Victorian researchers say they have taken the most detailed look ever at sea life around the iconic Twelve Apostles.…….
ABC News: Scientists using underwater cameras to document marine life along the south-west Victorian coastline.

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“Angling for alternatives as Omega-3 oil demand depletes fish” 3 July 2013. By Sean McComish:
Warranambool marine researchers have joined an international race to save the planet’s fish stocks by searching for sustainable ways to harvest fish oil…….
The Standard: The search for sustainable ways to harvest fish oil.

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“Conservation: Relaxed laws imperil Australian wildlife” 26 June 2013. By Euan G. Ritchie:
Nature.com ‐ Correspondence: Corresponding author Euan G. Ritchie

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“Greens leader plumbs the depths off Warrnambool to get another view on life” 21st June 2013. By Sean McComish:
Deakin University marine biologist Dr Alecia Bellgrove told The Standard researchers have noticed areas of kelp forests beginning to disappear……..
The Standard: Climate change could spell disaster to south-west’s marine ecosystem.

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“Mapping the depths around Wilsons Prom” 19th June 2013. By Bridie Smith:
Parks Victoria along with Deakin University (Daniel Ierodiaconou) are mapping the marine park around Wilsons Promontory and discovering…..
The Age: Maps reveal Prom’s underwater secrets.

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“Marine science head sees Deakin University as a world leader” 17th May 2013. By Jono Pech: 
Deakin University’s new Professor of Marine Science Graeme Hays hopes to make Warrnambool a major player in international marine and aquaculture research…..
The Standard: Marine science head sees Deakin Uni as a world leader.

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“Koalas” – where are they? 14th March 2013. By Desley Whisson:
Catalyst: Koalas – ABC TV Science.

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“Mapping Underwater-Victoria” 14th March 2013. By Dan Ierodiaconou:
Catalyst: Mapping Underwater Victoria – ABC TV Science.

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Discovering Papua New Guinea’s Mountain Mammals. By Euan Ritchie and Jim Thomas:

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Would you like seaweed with that? Sustainable nutrition solutions using Australian seaweeds. By Alecia Bellgrove, Giovanni Turchini, Russell Keast and Fernando Norambuena:

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Voyages of discovery: revealing Victoria’s ocean. By Daniel Ierodiaconou:

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How salty is your seafood? The effect of elevated salinity on fisheries relevant benthic marine beasties. By Julie Mondon:

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The inaugural Australian Academy of Science talk of John Endler (click on picture to play video, or click on this link http://goo.gl/47wn3): 

Professor John Arthur Endler - Through animals' eyes - new insights into sexual selection in Australian bowerbirds

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Prof John Endler and Dr. Laura Kelley unveil the bowerbirds’ secret to winning a mate. illusion the key to Bowerbirds mating success:

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Professor Marcel Klaassen talks about the sandpiper and his career path choice:

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Life on the sea floor (May 2012):

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Migratory Birds with Professor Marcel Klaassen (iTunes podcast):
To listen to the podcast click here.